Psychopharmacology

, Volume 155, Issue 3, pp 310–314

Reduced serotonin transporter binding in binge eating women

  • Jyrki T. Kuikka
  • Liisa Tammela
  • Leila Karhunen
  • Aila Rissanen
  • Kim A. Bergström
  • Hannu Naukkarinen
  • Esko Vanninen
  • Jari Karhu
  • Raimo Lappalainen
  • Eila Repo-Tiihonen
  • Jari Tiihonen
  • Matti Uusitupa
Original Investigation

DOI: 10.1007/s002130100716

Cite this article as:
Kuikka, J.T., Tammela, L., Karhunen, L. et al. Psychopharmacology (2001) 155: 310. doi:10.1007/s002130100716

Abstract.

Rationale: There is evidence that abnormalities in brain dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin metabolism may play an important role in binge eating. Serotonin-active antidepressant drugs have also been found to decrease binge eating. Objective: We investigated serotonin transporter binding in obese binge-eating women. Eleven obese binge-eating and seven obese control women participated in the study. The subjects were not taking any medication known to affect serotonin (5-HT) transporters. Methods: We used single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) with the radioligand 123I-labelled nor-β-CIT, which specifically labels 5-HT transporters. Results: Obese binge-eating women showed significantly decreased 5-HT transporter binding in the mid-brain compared with obese controls (2.1±0.5 versus 2.9±0.5, respectively). Conclusions: SPECT imaging with a ligand specific for 5-HT transporters can be used to assess altered serotonin transporter binding in the living human brain. The results tentatively suggest that 5-HT transporter binding is decreased in binge-eating women.

Binge eating Depression Obesity Serotonin SPECT

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jyrki T. Kuikka
    • 1
  • Liisa Tammela
    • 2
  • Leila Karhunen
    • 2
  • Aila Rissanen
    • 4
  • Kim A. Bergström
    • 1
  • Hannu Naukkarinen
    • 4
  • Esko Vanninen
    • 1
  • Jari Karhu
    • 1
  • Raimo Lappalainen
    • 3
  • Eila Repo-Tiihonen
    • 5
  • Jari Tiihonen
    • 5
  • Matti Uusitupa
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Clinical Physiology and Neurophysiology, Kuopio University Hospital, 70210 Kuopio, Finland
  2. 2.Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio and Kuopio University Hospital, 70210 Kuopio, Finland
  3. 3.Department of Psychology, University of Tampere, 33014 Tampere, Finland
  4. 4.Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, 00029 Helsinki, Finland
  5. 5.Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, 70240 Kuopio, Finland