Psychopharmacology

, Volume 148, Issue 3, pp 251–262

Evaluation of anti-cocaine antibodies and a cocaine vaccine in a rat self-administration model

  • K. M. Kantak
  • S. L. Collins
  • E. G. Lipman
  • J. Bond
  • K. Giovanoni
  • B. S. Fox
Original Investigation

DOI: 10.1007/s002130050049

Cite this article as:
Kantak, K., Collins, S., Lipman, E. et al. Psychopharmacology (2000) 148: 251. doi:10.1007/s002130050049

Abstract 

Rationale: Previous pre-clinical studies with an anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody left open several issues critical to assessing the effectiveness of a vaccine for altering cocaine self-administration behavior. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine, first, whether changes in self-administration behavior would be systematically related to antibody level and, second, how the antibody affected the self-administration of different doses of cocaine. Methods: Two experiments were conducted using a second-order schedule of drug delivery in rats. The first was a passive-administration study using the anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody MO240 to examine the relationship between antibody level and cocaine self-administration behavior, and the second was an active-immunization study to examine the efficacy of the cocaine vaccine IPC-1010 for blocking various doses of self-administered cocaine. Results: The passive-administration experiment with control and 4-mg or 12-mg MO240 treatments showed that antagonism of the 1 mg/kg cocaine training dose was dependent on antibody level. In animals whose serum antibody levels were sustained above 0.05 mg/ml, there was a sufficient amount of antibody to reduce drug-seeking behavior and drug intake. In the active-immunization experiment, the cocaine vaccine IPC-1010 induced average serum antibody levels of 0.08 mg/ml and reduced the reacquisition of behavior by 1 mg/kg cocaine. Antagonism of cocaine self-administration after immunization was evident across a range of doses of cocaine and was only apparent in animals whose serum antibody levels exceeded 0.05 mg/ml. Furthermore, there was no evidence that the antagonism was surmountable within the dose range examined (up to 5.6 mg/kg). Conclusions: Antagonism of cocaine self-administration across a range of doses is feasible after immunization with a cocaine vaccine as long as antibody levels are of a sufficient concentration.

Key words Active immunizationAnti-cocaine antibodyCocaineCocaine vaccineIPC-1010Second-order schedule of drug deliverySelf-administration

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. M. Kantak
    • 1
  • S. L. Collins
    • 1
  • E. G. Lipman
    • 1
  • J. Bond
    • 2
  • K. Giovanoni
    • 2
  • B. S. Fox
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Behavioral Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, USAUS
  2. 2.ImmuLogic Pharmaceutical Corporation, Waltham, Massachusetts, USAUS
  3. 3.Department of Psychology, Boston University, 64 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215, USA e-mail: kkantak@bu.edu, Tel.: +1-617-353-9201, Fax: +1-617-353-6933US