Psychopharmacology

, Volume 195, Issue 3, pp 315–324

Serotonin transporter binding after recovery from eating disorders

Authors

  • Ursula F. Bailer
    • Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh
    • Department of Biological Psychiatry, University Hospital of PsychiatryMedical University of Vienna
  • Guido K. Frank
    • Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh
    • Laboratory for Developmental Brain ResearchUniversity of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, The Children’s Hospital
  • Shannan E. Henry
    • Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh
  • Julie C. Price
    • Department of Radiology, Presbyterian University Hospital, School of MedicineUniversity of Pittsburgh
  • Carolyn C. Meltzer
    • Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh
    • Department of Radiology, Presbyterian University Hospital, School of MedicineUniversity of Pittsburgh
    • Departments of Radiology and NeurologyEmory School of Medicine
    • School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh
  • Carl Becker
    • Department of Radiology, Presbyterian University Hospital, School of MedicineUniversity of Pittsburgh
  • Scott K. Ziolko
    • Department of Radiology, Presbyterian University Hospital, School of MedicineUniversity of Pittsburgh
  • Chester A. Mathis
    • Department of Radiology, Presbyterian University Hospital, School of MedicineUniversity of Pittsburgh
  • Angela Wagner
    • Department of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryJ.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt/Main
    • Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh
  • Nicole C. Barbarich-Marsteller
    • New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and SurgeonsColumbia University Medical Center
  • Karen Putnam
    • Department of Environmental Health, Division of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsUniversity of Cincinnati School of Medicine
    • Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh
    • PsychiatryUniversity of California San Diego
    • School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh
Original Investigation

DOI: 10.1007/s00213-007-0896-7

Cite this article as:
Bailer, U.F., Frank, G.K., Henry, S.E. et al. Psychopharmacology (2007) 195: 315. doi:10.1007/s00213-007-0896-7

Abstract

Rationale

Several lines of evidence suggest that altered serotonin (5-HT) function persists after recovery from anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN).

Objectives

We compared 11 subjects who recovered (>1 year normal weight, regular menstrual cycles, no bingeing or purging) from restricting-type AN (REC RAN), 7 who recovered from bulimia-type AN (REC BAN), 9 who recovered from BN (REC BN), and 10 healthy control women (CW).

Materials and methods

Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with [11C]McN5652 was used to assess the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT). For [11C]McN5652, distribution volume (DV) values were determined using a two-compartment, three-parameter tracer kinetic model, and specific binding was assessed using the binding potential (BP, BP = DVregion of interest/DVcerebellum − 1).

Results

After correction for multiple comparisons, the four groups showed significant (p < 0.05) differences for [11C]McN5652 BP values for the dorsal raphe and antero-ventral striatum (AVS). Post-hoc analysis revealed that REC RAN had significantly increased [11C]McN5652 BP compared to REC BAN in these regions.

Conclusions

Divergent 5-HTT activity in subtypes of eating disorder subjects may provide important insights as to why these groups have differences in affective regulation and impulse control.

Keywords

Anorexia nervosa Bulimia nervosa Serotonin transporter Positron emission tomography Serotonin 5-HTTLPR

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007