, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 589-596

Prevalence of sarcopenia and associated risk factors by two diagnostic criteria in community-dwelling older men: the São Paulo Ageing & Health Study (SPAH)

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Abstract

Summary

Sarcopenia is an aging syndrome that can be characterized by many criteria adjusted or not by fat mass. This study suggested that the optimal criteria should be selected according to body mass index (BMI) in older men and identified age, BMI, race, smoking, physical activity, hip bone mineral density (BMD) as risk factors for this syndrome.

Introduction

This study aims to analyze the prevalence of sarcopenia and associated risk factors using appendicular skeletal mass (ASM)/height2 and ASM adjusted for total fat mass criteria in older men from community.

Methods

Three hundred ninety-nine men were included and answered a questionnaire about lifestyle and medical history. Individuals were classified by their BMI using the classification adjusted by age. Body composition and bone mineral density were measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Sarcopenia was classified according to both criteria. Logistic regression models were used to analyze risk factors associated with sarcopenia.

Results

The mean BMI was 26.46 kg/m2: 12.5 % underweight, 43.6 % normal, and 43.9 % overweight/obese. Fifty-four (13.5 %) were considered sarcopenic by ASM/height2 and 79 (19.8 %) by ASM adjusted for fat (p = 0.001). Fifty-one (12.8 %) individuals had discordant sarcopenia classification: 13 were classified only by ASM/height2 and 38 only by ASM adjusted for fat. Of the 13 subjects classified as sarcopenic only by ASM/height2, 84.6 % (11/13) were underweight and solely one (7.7 %) was considered overweight/obese. In contrast, of those 38 older men classified as sarcopenic only by ASM adjusted for fat, none were underweight and 53 % (20/38) were overweight/obese. Subjects classified as sarcopenic according to both criteria had the same risk factors in the final model analyses (age, BMI, race, smoking, physical activity, hip BMD; p < 0.05).

Conclusion

This study suggested that the optimal criteria for sarcopenia should be selected according to BMI in community-dwelling older men.