Original Article

Osteoporosis International

, Volume 21, Issue 10, pp 1695-1701

Low bone mineral density is not associated with angiographically determined coronary atherosclerosis in men

  • S. BeerAffiliated withVorarlberg Institute for Vascular Investigation and Treatment (VIVIT)Department of Medicine, Academic Teaching Hospital FeldkirchPrivate University of the Principality of Liechtenstein
  • , C. H. SaelyAffiliated withVorarlberg Institute for Vascular Investigation and Treatment (VIVIT)Department of Medicine, Academic Teaching Hospital FeldkirchPrivate University of the Principality of Liechtenstein
  • , G. HoefleAffiliated withVorarlberg Institute for Vascular Investigation and Treatment (VIVIT)
  • , P. ReinAffiliated withVorarlberg Institute for Vascular Investigation and Treatment (VIVIT)Department of Medicine, Academic Teaching Hospital FeldkirchPrivate University of the Principality of Liechtenstein
  • , A. VonbankAffiliated withVorarlberg Institute for Vascular Investigation and Treatment (VIVIT)Department of Medicine, Academic Teaching Hospital FeldkirchPrivate University of the Principality of Liechtenstein
  • , J. BreussAffiliated withVorarlberg Institute for Vascular Investigation and Treatment (VIVIT)
  • , B. GaensbacherAffiliated withVorarlberg Institute for Vascular Investigation and Treatment (VIVIT)
  • , A. MuendleinAffiliated withVorarlberg Institute for Vascular Investigation and Treatment (VIVIT)Private University of the Principality of Liechtenstein
  • , H. DrexelAffiliated withVorarlberg Institute for Vascular Investigation and Treatment (VIVIT)Department of Medicine, Academic Teaching Hospital FeldkirchPrivate University of the Principality of LiechtensteinDrexel University College of Medicine Email author 

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Abstract

Summary

This study for the first time investigates the association of bone mineral density (BMD) with angiographically determined coronary atherosclerosis in men. Our data show that the prevalence of low BMD is very high in men undergoing coronary angiography. However, neither osteopenia nor osteoporosis is associated with an increased prevalence of angiographically determined coronary atherosclerosis.

Introduction

The association of low BMD with angiographically determined coronary atherosclerosis in men is unknown.

Methods

We enrolled 623 consecutive men undergoing coronary angiography for the evaluation of established or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). BMD was assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry. CAD was diagnosed in the presence of any coronary artery lumen narrowing at angiography; coronary stenoses with lumen narrowing ≥50% were considered significant.

Results

From the total study cohort (mean age of 64 ± 11 years), 207 patients (33.2%) had osteopenia and 65 (10.4%) had osteoporosis; at angiography, CAD was diagnosed in 558 patients (89.6%) and 403 (64.7%) had significant coronary stenoses. In multivariate logistic regression analysis neither osteopenia nor osteoporosis was associated with an increased prevalence of CAD (adjusted odds ratios (ORs) = 0.71 [95% confidence interval 0.40–1.23]; p = 0.222 and 1.03 [0.38–2.80]; p = 0.955, respectively) or with significant coronary stenoses (OR 0.74 [0.52–1.07], p = 0.112 and 0.72 [0.41–1.26]; p = 0.251, respectively). Also, as a continuous variable, BMD was not associated with angiographically diagnosed CAD.

Conclusions

The prevalence of low BMD is very high in men undergoing coronary angiography. However, low BMD is not associated with angiographically determined coronary atherosclerosis in men.

Keywords

Atherosclerosis Bone mineral density Cardiovascular risk Coronary angiography Dual X-ray absorptiometry