Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 39, Issue 7, pp 1262–1271

The flow dependency of Tie2 expression in endotoxemia

  • Neng F. Kurniati
  • Rianne M. Jongman
  • Franziska vom Hagen
  • Katherine C. Spokes
  • Jill Moser
  • Erzsébet Ravasz Regan
  • Guido Krenning
  • Jan-Renier A. J. Moonen
  • Martin C. Harmsen
  • Michel M. R. F. Struys
  • Hans-Peter Hammes
  • Jan G. Zijlstra
  • William C. Aird
  • Peter Heeringa
  • Grietje Molema
  • Matijs van Meurs
Original

DOI: 10.1007/s00134-013-2899-7

Cite this article as:
Kurniati, N.F., Jongman, R.M., vom Hagen, F. et al. Intensive Care Med (2013) 39: 1262. doi:10.1007/s00134-013-2899-7

Abstract

Rationale

Tie2 is predominantly expressed by endothelial cells and is involved in vascular integrity control during sepsis. Changes in Tie2 expression during sepsis development may contribute to microvascular dysfunction. Understanding the kinetics and molecular basis of these changes may assist in the development of therapeutic intervention to counteract microvascular dysfunction.

Objective

To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the changes in Tie2 expression upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge.

Methods and results

Studies were performed in LPS and pro-inflammatory cytokine challenged mice as well as in mice subjected to hemorrhagic shock, primary endothelial cells were used for in vitro experiments in static and flow conditions. Eight hours after LPS challenge, Tie2 mRNA loss was observed in all major organs, while loss of Tie2 protein was predominantly observed in lungs and kidneys, in the capillaries. A similar loss could be induced by secondary cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. Ang2 protein administration did not affect Tie2 protein expression nor was Tie2 protein rescued in LPS-challenged Ang2-deficient mice, excluding a major role for Ang2 in Tie2 down regulation. In vitro, endothelial loss of Tie2 was observed upon lowering of shear stress, not upon LPS and TNF-α stimulation, suggesting that inflammation related haemodynamic changes play a major role in loss of Tie2 in vivo, as also hemorrhagic shock induced Tie2 mRNA loss. In vitro, this loss was partially counteracted by pre-incubation with a pharmacologically NF-кB inhibitor (BAY11-7082), an effect further substantiated in vivo by pre-treatment of mice with the NF-кB inhibitor prior to the inflammatory challenge.

Conclusions

Microvascular bed specific loss of Tie2 mRNA and protein in vivo upon LPS, TNFα, IL-1β challenge, as well as in response to hemorrhagic shock, is likely an indirect effect caused by a change in endothelial shear stress. This loss of Tie2 mRNA, but not Tie2 protein, induced by TNFα exposure was shown to be controlled by NF-кB signaling. Drugs aiming at restoring vascular integrity in sepsis could focus on preventing the Tie2 loss.

Keywords

Lipopolysaccharide Endothelial Tie2 Flow In vitro In vivo 

Non-standard abbreviations and acronyms

LPS

Lipopolysaccharide

TNF-α

Tumor Necrosis Factor-α

IL-1β

Interleukin-1β

TLR4

Toll-like receptor-4

NF-кB

Nuclear factor kappa B

KLF2

Kruppel-like factor-2

Ang1/2

Angiopoietin-1/-2

HUVEC

Human umbilical vein endothelial cells

ciGEnC

Conditionally immortalized glomerular endothelial cells

WPB

Weibel-Palade Bodies

Supplementary material

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Supplementary material 1 (TIFF 630 kb)
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Supplementary material 3 (TIFF 683 kb)
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Supplementary material 4 (TIFF 564 kb)
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Supplementary material 5 (TIFF 795 kb)
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Supplementary material 6 (TIFF 907 kb)
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Supplementary material 7 (DOCX 12 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg and ESICM 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Neng F. Kurniati
    • 1
    • 6
  • Rianne M. Jongman
    • 1
    • 5
  • Franziska vom Hagen
    • 3
  • Katherine C. Spokes
    • 4
  • Jill Moser
    • 1
    • 2
  • Erzsébet Ravasz Regan
    • 4
  • Guido Krenning
    • 1
  • Jan-Renier A. J. Moonen
    • 1
  • Martin C. Harmsen
    • 1
  • Michel M. R. F. Struys
    • 5
  • Hans-Peter Hammes
    • 3
  • Jan G. Zijlstra
    • 2
  • William C. Aird
    • 4
  • Peter Heeringa
    • 1
  • Grietje Molema
    • 1
  • Matijs van Meurs
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pathology and Medical Biology, Medical Biology SectionUniversity Medical Center Groningen, University of GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Critical CareUniversity Medical Center Groningen, University of GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.5th Medical ClinicUniversity-Clinic Mannheim, University of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  4. 4.Department of MedicineCenter for Vascular Biology Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  5. 5.Department of AnesthesiologyUniversity Medical Center Groningen, University of GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands
  6. 6.School of PharmacyInstitute of Technology BandungBandungIndonesia

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