Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology

, Volume 80, Issue 2, pp 102–106

Survey of Airborne Polyfluorinated Telomers in Keihan Area, Japan

Authors

  • Sayoko Oono
    • Department of Health and Environmental SciencesKyoto University Graduate School of Medicine
  • Eriko Matsubara
    • Department of Health and Environmental SciencesKyoto University Graduate School of Medicine
  • Kouji H. Harada
    • Department of Health and Environmental SciencesKyoto University Graduate School of Medicine
  • Sokichi Takagi
    • Osaka Prefectural Institute of Public Health
  • Sachiko Hamada
    • Kyoto Prefectural Institute of Public Health and Environment
  • Akihiro Asakawa
    • Department of Health and Environmental SciencesKyoto University Graduate School of Medicine
  • Kayoko Inoue
    • Department of Health and Environmental SciencesKyoto University Graduate School of Medicine
  • Isao Watanabe
    • Osaka Prefectural Institute of Public Health
    • Department of Health and Environmental SciencesKyoto University Graduate School of Medicine
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00128-007-9324-2

Cite this article as:
Oono, S., Matsubara, E., Harada, K.H. et al. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol (2008) 80: 102. doi:10.1007/s00128-007-9324-2

Abstract

Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are environmental contaminants posing special public health concerns because of their long-term persistence and bioaccumulation in the environment. Fluorotelomer alcohols are volatile and may undergo long-range transport. Air samples were collected at five sites in the Keihan area, Japan: Sakyo, Morinomiya and three sites in Higashiyodogawa. Except for Higashiyodogawa, the highest concentrations of fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) were for 8:2 FTOH (median 447 pg m−3) followed by 10:2 FTOH (56 pg m−3) and 6:2 FTOH (22 pg m−3). In contrast, 8:2 FTOAcryl (median 865 pg m−3) and 8:2 FTOH (1,864 pg m−3) were both major components in Higashiyodogawa. Compared to data published for North America and Europe, 8:2 FTOH levels are significantly higher in Keihan, suggesting a possible point source.

Keywords

AirFluorotelomerGC/MSJapan

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007