Short Communication

Naturwissenschaften

, Volume 99, Issue 1, pp 83-87

The first record of a sauropod dinosaur from Antarctica

  • Ignacio A. CerdaAffiliated withConsejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas (CONICET), INIBIOMA, Museo de Geología y Paleontología Universidad Nacional del Comahue Email author 
  • , Ariana Paulina CarabajalAffiliated withCONICET, Museo Carmen Funes
  • , Leonardo SalgadoAffiliated withConsejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas (CONICET), INIBIOMA, Museo de Geología y Paleontología Universidad Nacional del Comahue
  • , Rodolfo A. CoriaAffiliated withCONICET, Museo Carmen FunesInstituto de Investigación en Paleobiología y Geología, Universidad Nacional de Río Negro
  • , Marcelo A. RegueroAffiliated withCONICET, División Paleontología de Vertebrados, Museo de La PlataInstituto Antártico Argentino
  • , Claudia P. TambussiAffiliated withCONICET, División Paleontología de Vertebrados, Museo de La Plata
  • , Juan J. MolyAffiliated withDivisión Paleontología de Vertebrados, Museo de La Plata

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Abstract

Sauropoda is one of the most diverse and geographically widespread clades of herbivorous dinosaurs, and until now, their remains have now been recovered from all continental landmasses except Antarctica. We report the first record of a sauropod dinosaur from Antarctica, represented by an incomplete caudal vertebra from the Late Cretaceous of James Ross Island. The size and morphology of the specimen allows its identification as a lithostrotian titanosaur. Our finding indicates that advanced titanosaurs achieved a global distribution at least by the Late Cretaceous.

Keywords

Antarctic Peninsula Upper Cretaceous Titanosauria Lithostrotia