International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 4–13

Social-cognitive predictors of dietary behaviors in South Korean men and women

  • Britta Renner
  • Sunkyo Kwon
  • Byung-Hwan Yang
  • Ki-Chung Paik
  • Seok Hyeon Kim
  • Sungwon Roh
  • Jaechul Song
  • Ralf Schwarzer
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF03003068

Cite this article as:
Renner, B., Kwon, S., Yang, BH. et al. Int. J. Behav. Med. (2008) 15: 4. doi:10.1007/BF03003068

Abstract

Background: Eating a diet that is high in vitamins and low in fat is considered to be governed by social-cognitive factors, such as intentions, planning, self-efficacy, and outcome expectancies. Purpose: A longitudinal field study was designed to examine the interrelationships of these factors with dietary behaviors. Method: In 697 South Korean men and women, objective health-risk status was assessed at Time 1 (cholesterol, blood pressure, and body mass index) in conjunction with self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, and intentions. At Time 2, six months later, coping self-efficacy, planning, and dietary behaviors were measured. A two-group structural equation model for men and women was specified to determine the relations of distal and proximal predictors of a healthy diet. Results: Self-efficacy was of equal predictive power in men and women, whereas intentions and planning were relevant only in women. Objective risk status was associated with intentions in women but not in men. Conclusions: Results confirm the predictive power of the Health Action Process Approach and point to the role of gender in the self-regulation of dietary behaviors.

Key words

intentionplanningriskself-efficacynutrition

Copyright information

© International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Britta Renner
    • 1
  • Sunkyo Kwon
    • 2
  • Byung-Hwan Yang
    • 3
  • Ki-Chung Paik
    • 4
  • Seok Hyeon Kim
    • 3
  • Sungwon Roh
    • 3
  • Jaechul Song
    • 5
  • Ralf Schwarzer
    • 6
  1. 1.University of ConstanceGermany
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyHallym UniversityChuncheonSouth Korea
  3. 3.Department of Neuropsychiatry, College of MedicineHanyang UniversitySeoulSouth Korea
  4. 4.Department of Psy-chiatry, College of MedicineDankook UniversityCheon-AnSouth Korea
  5. 5.Department of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, College of MedicineHanyang UniversitySeoulSouth Korea
  6. 6.Freie Universität BerlinGermany
  7. 7.Personality Assessment and Health PsychologyUniversity of Constance Department of PsychologyKonstanzGermany