International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 164–172

Cognitive behavioral stress management intervention improves quality of life in spanish monolingual hispanic men treated for localized prostate cancer: Results of a randomized controlled trial

  • Frank J. Penedo
  • Lara Traeger
  • Jason Dahn
  • Ivan Molton
  • Jeffrey S. Gonzalez
  • Neil Schneiderman
  • Michael H. Antoni
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF03000188

Cite this article as:
Penedo, F.J., Traeger, L., Dahn, J. et al. Int. J. Behav. Med. (2007) 14: 164. doi:10.1007/BF03000188

Abstract

Background: The efficacy of a group-based psychosocial intervention with ethnic minority health populations may depend on consideration for cultural factors that can interact with group processes. Purpose: The current study explored the efficacy of a 10-week group-based cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM) intervention that was linguistically and culturally adapted for use with Hispanic monolingual men recently treated for localized prostate carcinoma (PC). Methods: 71 Hispanic monolingual Spanish speakers were randomly assigned to a 10-week CBSM intervention or a half-day stress management seminar (control condition). Hierarchical regression was used to predict post-intervention QoL. Results: After controlling for relevant covariates, assignment to the CBSM condition significantly predicted greater physical well-being, emotional well-being, sexual functioning, and total well-being after the 10-week intervention period. Conclusions: Results suggest that participation in a culturally and linguistically adapted CBSM group intervention improved QoL in Hispanic monolingual men treated for localized PC.

Key words

cognitive-behavioral stress managementprostate carcinomaquality of lifegroup interventionHispanicsSpanish

Copyright information

© International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank J. Penedo
    • 1
  • Lara Traeger
    • 2
  • Jason Dahn
    • 3
  • Ivan Molton
    • 4
  • Jeffrey S. Gonzalez
    • 5
  • Neil Schneiderman
    • 6
  • Michael H. Antoni
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Miami, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami School of Medicine, and Miami VA Medical CenterCoral GablesUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MiamiUSA
  3. 3.Miami VA Medical CenterUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MiamiUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychiatryHarvard Medical School/ Massachusetts General HospitalUSA
  6. 6.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Miami and Miami VA Medical CenterUSA
  7. 7.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Miami, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami School of Medicine, and Miami VA Medical CenterUSA