, Volume 27, Issue 3, pp 671-686

Interface attachment kinetics in alloy solidification

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Abstract

The current status of our understanding of nonequilibrium interface kinetics during solidification is reviewed. Measurements of solute trapping and kinetic interfacial undercooling during rapid alloy solidification are accounted for by the continuous growth model (CGM) without solute drag. Disorder trapping has been predicted and observed in the rapid solidification of ordered intermetallic compounds. In systems that undergo either solute or disorder trapping, a transition from short-range diffusion-limited to collision-limited growth occurs, which originates in the reduced driving free energy for the formation of such metastable materials, resulting in three orders of magnitude change in the interface mobility. Applications to cellular and dendritic growth are discussed. A correlation is presented for estimating the diffusive speed—the growth rate necessary for substantial solute trapping—for alloy systems in which it has not, or cannot, be measured. The raw data for Si(Bi) solute trapping measurements to which many models have been compared are presented in the Appendix.

This article is based on a presentation made at the “Analysis and Modeling of Solidification” symposium as part of the 1994 Fall meeting of TMS in Rosemont, Illinois, October 2–6, 1994, under the auspices of the TMS Solidification Committee.