Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp 397–407

Elevated blood serotonin in autistic probands and their first-degree relatives

Authors

  • Ruth K. Abramson
    • William S. Hall Psychiatric Institute
  • Harry H. Wright
    • University of South Carolina School of Medicine
  • Richard Carpenter
    • University of South Carolina School of Medicine
  • William Brennan
    • University of South Carolina School of Medicine
  • Osvaldo Lumpuy
    • University of South Carolina School of Medicine
  • Elisabeth Cole
    • University of South Carolina School of Medicine
  • S. Robert Young
    • University of South Carolina School of Medicine
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02212938

Cite this article as:
Abramson, R.K., Wright, H.H., Carpenter, R. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (1989) 19: 397. doi:10.1007/BF02212938

Abstract

Whole blood serotonin levels and platelet counts were studied in 14 families, representing 57 family members and 15 probands who met DSM III criteria for infantile autism. High serotonin appeared to segregate in families. When two parents had high serotonin, the serotonin level in their offspring was twice the parental level. When one parent had high serotonin, the serotonin level in the offspring approximated the level of serotonin in either the high serotonin parent or the low serotonin parent. For the case where both parents had low serotonin, in one family the children had low serotonin and in a second family, high serotonin levels were present in the autistic proband, and a sibling with severe mental retardation. Mean serotonin levels were higher for both male and female, autistics and family members, in the four black families than in the 10 Caucasian families.

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1989