Archives of Virology

, Volume 141, Issue 3, pp 715–726

Epidemiology of symptomatic human rotaviruses in Bangalore and Mysore, India, from 1988 to 1994 as determined by electropherotype, subgroup and serotype analysis

Authors

  • S. Aijaz
    • Department of Microbiology and Cell BiologyIndian Institute of Science
  • K. Gowda
    • Department of Microbiology and Cell BiologyIndian Institute of Science
  • H. V. Jagannath
    • Department of Microbiology and Cell BiologyIndian Institute of Science
  • R. R. Reddy
    • Department of Microbiology and Cell BiologyIndian Institute of Science
  • P. P. Maiya
    • M. S. Ramaiah Hospital
  • R. L. Ward
    • James N. Gamble Institute of Medical Research
  • H. B. Greenberg
    • Department of Medicine, School of MedicineStanford University Stanfore and the Palo Alto VA Medical Center
  • M. Raju
    • Cheluvamba Hospital
  • A. Babu
    • Cheluvamba Hospital
  • C. Durga Rao
    • Department of Microbiology and Cell BiologyIndian Institute of Science
    • Centre for Genetic EngineeringIndian Institute of Science
Brief Report

DOI: 10.1007/BF01718329

Cite this article as:
Aijaz, S., Gowda, K., Jagannath, H.V. et al. Archives of Virology (1996) 141: 715. doi:10.1007/BF01718329

Summary

Epidemiology of symptomatic rotaviruses from Bangalore and Mysore in Southern India was investigated. While serotype G3 predominated throughout the 7-year study period from 1988 to 1994 in Bangalore, serotype G1 was more predominant than serotype G3 in Mysore during 1993 and 1994. Serotype G2 strains were either not detected or infrequently observed in both the cities. However, several strains with subgroup I and ‘short’ RNA pattern that exhibited high reactivity with typing MAbs specific for serotype 2 as well as other serotypes were detected throughout the period. Among the nonserotypeable strains from both cities, several exhibited dual subgroup (SGI+II) or subgroup I specificity and ‘long’ RNA pattern indicating their probable animal origin. Notably, a gradual, yet highly significant reduction in rotavirus gastroenteritis, from 45.3% in 1988 to 1.8% during 1994, was observed in Bangalore in stark contrast to the consistently high (about 34%) incidence of asymptomatic infections among neonates by I321-like G10P11 type strains during the same period. Moreover, I321-like asymptomatic strains were not detected in children with diarrhea.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996