Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 1–9

Hexachlorobenzene uptake by Fathead minnows and macroinvertebrates in recirculating sediment/water systems

Authors

  • Gerald S. Schuytema
    • Corvallis Environmental Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • Daniel F. Krawczyk
    • Corvallis Environmental Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • William L. Griffis
    • Corvallis Environmental Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • Alan V. Nebeker
    • Corvallis Environmental Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • Merline L. Robideaux
    • Corvallis Environmental Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF01059806

Cite this article as:
Schuytema, G.S., Krawczyk, D.F., Griffis, W.L. et al. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. (1990) 19: 1. doi:10.1007/BF01059806

Abstract

Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), the worm,Lumbriculus variegatus, and the amphipodsHyalella azteca andGammarus lacustris were exposed to hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in water with and without a bed of HCB-spiked sediment. Water HCB concentrations were maintained by recirculation through HCB-packed columns. Recirculating HCB-bound particulates and possibly eroded HCB particulates were an added source of HCB in addition to the sediment bed. Significant bioaccumulation of HCB in animal tissues was observed in water-only and water-sediment exposures. The presence of the HCB-spiked sediment did not result in a significant increase in the uptake of HCB by the organisms, but there was a substantial increase in sediment HCB levels over time. Higher tissue HCB levels in aquaria without sediment suggest that the sediment was a more efficient sink for HCB than the organisms.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990