Skeletal Radiology

, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 77–84

MRI of soft tissue tumors

Authors

  • George B. Greenfield
    • Department of RadiologyUniversity of South Florida, College of Medicine
    • Department of RadiologyH. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute
    • Department of RadiologyShriners Hospital for Crippled Children
  • John A. Arrington
    • Department of RadiologyUniversity of South Florida, College of Medicine
    • Department of RadiologyH. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute
    • Department of RadiologyShriners Hospital for Crippled Children
  • Brace T. Kudryk
    • Department of RadiologyUniversity of South Florida, College of Medicine
    • Department of RadiologyH. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute
Reviews

DOI: 10.1007/BF00197982

Cite this article as:
Greenfield, G.B., Arrington, J.A. & Kudryk, B.T. Skeletal Radiol. (1993) 22: 77. doi:10.1007/BF00197982

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the only noninvasive method of defining a soft tissue tumor. The extent of the tumor and the question of involvement or noninvolvement of various adjacent tissues and structures can be determined. This information, determination of lymphatic and distant metastatic spread, is invaluable for staging and management of the disease. Whether or not the tumor type can be reliably determined, or even whether the malignant or benign nature of the tumor can be ascertained on MRI examination, is open to question. Review of the literature indicates proponents on both sides of the issue. This review illustrates the imaging features that are relevant to suggesting a histologic diagnosis, and the pitfalls that are encountered in trying to determine the malignancy or benignity of a lesion. The clinical significance of these determinations is also discussed.

Key words

MRISoft tissue tumors

Copyright information

© International Skeletal Society 1993