Immunology (JS Bromberg, Section Editor)

Current Transplantation Reports

, Volume 1, Issue 3, pp 155-165

Non-Antibody Mediated Roles of B Cells in Allograft Survival

  • Geetha ChalasaniAffiliated withDepartments of Medicine (Renal-Electrolyte), University of Pittsburgh School of MedicineImmunology, University of Pittsburgh School of MedicineThomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
  • , David RothsteinAffiliated withDepartments of Medicine (Renal-Electrolyte), University of Pittsburgh School of MedicineSurgery, University of Pittsburgh School of MedicineImmunology, University of Pittsburgh School of MedicineThomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Email author 

Abstract

Antibody production is unquestionably a key effector function of B cells that remains a formidable barrier against long-term graft survival. However, emerging evidence indicates that B cells play a key role in shaping the effector responses by mechanisms that extend beyond their function as antibody producing cells. B cell depletion in transplant recipients has resulted in paradoxical outcomes of increased graft rejection versus improved graft function, implying that B cells function as both enhancers and regulators of the alloimmune response. Based on findings from animal and human studies, we address mechanisms by which B cells modulate the immune response and highlight their role in promoting allograft rejection or tolerance.

Keywords

Effector B cells Antibody-independent Antigen presentation Transplant rejection Regulatory B cells TNFα IL-10 TIM-1 Transplant tolerance Allograft survival