, Volume 31, Issue 3, pp 177-179
Date: 22 Jan 2013

Improving Confidence in Observational Studies

This is an excerpt from the content

A 2012 member survey conducted by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) asked respondents about perceived barriers to using health economics and outcomes research in decision making [1]. The results were sobering. Among 130 self-identified decision makers responding to the survey, 45 % indicated that a perception among end users that research findings were methodologically flawed posed a ‘significant’ or ‘moderate’ barrier to using outcomes research in decision making [1]. In addition, 62 % of the decision makers indicated that a perception among end users that research findings were biased posed a ‘significant’ or ‘moderate’ barrier to using health economics and outcomes research in decision making [1]. The respondent sample size was small, raising questions regarding the generalizability of responses.

However, the respondents’ answers were consistent in spirit with results published 15 years ago [2] as well as those published more recently [37] ...