Infection

, Volume 27, Issue 6, pp 365–367

Rapid Diagnosis of Primary Dengue Fever by the Immunochromatographic Test and by Electron Microscopy – A Case Report

Authors

  • Regina Allwinn
    • Institute for Medical Virology, J.W.Goethe University Frankfurt/Main, Sandhofstr. 2–4, D-60528 Frankfurt a. M., Germany, e-mail: Allwinn@em.uni-frankfurt.de
  • C. Schieferstein
    • Institute for Medical Virology, J.W.Goethe University Frankfurt/Main, Sandhofstr. 2–4, D-60528 Frankfurt a. M., Germany, e-mail: Allwinn@em.uni-frankfurt.de
  • S. Glauke
    • Institute for Medical Virology, J.W.Goethe University Frankfurt/Main, Sandhofstr. 2–4, D-60528 Frankfurt a. M., Germany, e-mail: Allwinn@em.uni-frankfurt.de
  • H.W. Doerr
    • Institute for Medical Virology, J.W.Goethe University Frankfurt/Main, Sandhofstr. 2–4, D-60528 Frankfurt a. M., Germany, e-mail: Allwinn@em.uni-frankfurt.de
Case Reports

DOI: 10.1007/s150100050045

Cite this article as:
Allwinn, R., Schieferstein, C., Glauke, S. et al. Infection (1999) 27: 365. doi:10.1007/s150100050045
  • 54 Views

Summary

A 21-year-old women presented with an acute febrile illness after a two-week holiday in Jamaica. Her symptoms started two days after return, with sudden onset of continuous higher fever (> 39 °C), dizziness and nausea. Three days later she developed a generalized macular rash, which led to the tentative diagnosis “acute dengue fever”. Laboratory confirmation was achieved by demonstrating anti-dengue IgM and IgG antibodies in paired sera; in addition, flavivirus particles were directly visualized by electron microscopy.

Key words DengueRapid diagnosisSerologyFlavivirus

Copyright information

© Urban & Vogel Medien und Medizin Verlagsgesellschaft 1999