Infection

, Volume 41, Issue 6, pp 1103–1109

Comparison of cognitive performance in HIV or HCV mono-infected and HIV–HCV co-infected patients

  • N. Ciccarelli
  • M. Fabbiani
  • P. Grima
  • K. Falasca
  • M. Tana
  • E. Baldonero
  • M. Colafigli
  • M. C. Silveri
  • J. Vecchiet
  • R. Cauda
  • S. Di Giambenedetto
Clinical and Epidemiological Study

DOI: 10.1007/s15010-013-0503-2

Cite this article as:
Ciccarelli, N., Fabbiani, M., Grima, P. et al. Infection (2013) 41: 1103. doi:10.1007/s15010-013-0503-2

Abstract

Purpose

Our aim was to explore the interplay between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections in the expression of cognitive disorders.

Methods

We performed a multi-centre cross-sectional study, enrolling three groups of asymptomatic outpatients matched for age and education: (1) HIV mono-infected; (2) HCV mono-infected; (3) HIV–HCV co-infected. All subjects were subjected to the Zung depression scale and a comprehensive neuropsychological battery.

Results

A total of 50 patients for each group were enrolled. Patients in the three groups did not significantly differ in the main common demographic and clinical characteristics, except for a lower proportion of past injecting drug use (IDU) in group 1 (4 %) in comparison to groups 2 (38 %, p < 0.001) and 3 (78 %, p < 0.001), a longer duration of HIV infection in group 3 in comparison to group 1 (p < 0.001) and a longer duration of HCV infection in group 3 in comparison to group 2 (p = 0.028). Overall, 39.3 % of patients showed minor cognitive impairment, with a higher proportion in group 3 (54 %) when compared to groups 1 (28 %, p = 0.015) or 2 (36 %, p = 0.108). Patients in group 3 [odds ratio (OR) 3.35, p = 0.038 when compared to group 1] and those with higher depression scores (OR 1.05, p = 0.017) showed an increased risk of cognitive impairment after adjusting for education and past injection drug use. In particular, group 3 showed worse performance in psychomotor speed tasks when compared to group 1 (p = 0.033).

Conclusions

A worse cognitive performance in HIV–HCV co-infected patients was observed, suggesting an additive role of the two viruses in the pathogenesis of cognitive disorders.

Keywords

HIV HCV Co-infection Neuropsychological examination Cognitive impairment 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Ciccarelli
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Fabbiani
    • 1
  • P. Grima
    • 3
  • K. Falasca
    • 4
  • M. Tana
    • 3
  • E. Baldonero
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Colafigli
    • 1
  • M. C. Silveri
    • 2
  • J. Vecchiet
    • 4
  • R. Cauda
    • 1
  • S. Di Giambenedetto
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Clinical Infectious DiseasesCatholic University of Sacred HeartRomeItaly
  2. 2.Memory ClinicCatholic University of Sacred HeartRomeItaly
  3. 3.Division of Infectious DiseasesS. Caterina Novella HospitalGalatina (Lecce)Italy
  4. 4.Infectious Diseases ClinicUniversity of ChietiChietiItaly

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