Neotropical Entomology

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 115–117

First Record of Elixothrips brevisetis (Bagnall) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in Brazil

Scientific Note

DOI: 10.1007/s13744-012-0090-4

Cite this article as:
Lima, E.F.B. & Milanez, J.M. Neotrop Entomol (2013) 42: 115. doi:10.1007/s13744-012-0090-4
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Abstract

Elixothrips brevisetis (Bagnall), a species exotic to Brazil, is first recorded in the country. Individuals were collected on banana fruits (Musa sp.) (Musaceae) in July 2010 in the municipality of Luís Alves, state of Santa Catarina, causing rusting on the fruit peel in several bunches of bananas.

Keywords

Banana invasive species pest thrips rusting 

The banana rind thrips, Elixothrips brevisetis (Bagnall), is a phytophagous species native to the Indomalaya ecozone and widely distributed in islands in the Indian and Pacific oceans, where it is of economic importance as it is considered a pest of banana crops (Mound & Marullo 1996).

Elixothrips brevisetis is here recorded for the first time in Brazil. The voucher specimens collected on banana fruits (Musa sp.) in the municipality of Luís Alves, state of Santa Catarina, were mounted on permanent microscope slides following the technique proposed by Mound & Marullo (1996) and were deposited in the “Coleção Entomológica do Departmento de Entomologia e Acarologia, Escola Superior de Agricultura ‘Luiz de Queiroz’” (ESALQ/USP).

Individuals of E. brevisetis were causing characteristic rusty marks in the fruit peels (Fig 1a). These symptoms can take whole bunches and prevent the marketing of fruits. Despite its importance, E. brevisetis is not listed as quarantine pest A1 in Brazil (MAPA 2007). Nevertheless, our note meets the legal requirements imposed by the Brazilian government to report invasive species to the country, and it has been approved by the Ministry of Agriculture (ref. doc. no. 70570-000339/2012-79).
Fig 1

a Characteristic rusty marks in the fruit peels. b Antennal segments II-VI, with two sense cones overlapping on III and IV. c Cheeks constricted behind eyes and at base. d Mesonotum completely divided by a median longitudinal line. e Forewings clear with dark bands. f Abdominal tergite II with stout tricoid processes laterally. g Abdominal segment X with expanded terminal setae.

The banana rind thrips cause the appearance of silver and eventually dark brown spots in plant tissue due to their feeding on fruits. On leaf tips, their feeding results in wilting and curling. The underside of attacked leaves is spotted with small black fecal specks. Flowers become flecked, spotted, and deformed, and many buds fail to open. These thrips can be found in larger numbers between the stem and the leaf sheaths (Metcalf & Flint 1962). In Hawaii, Muruvanda (1986) reported that this species caused scarification and cracked and corky growth on banana fruits. Besides Brazil, E. brevisetis is also recorded in the neotropical region in Guadeloupe (Mound & Marullo 1996), Martinique (Rey 2002), Cuba (González & Castillo 2009), and Ecuador (Galápagos Islands) (Hoddle & Mound 2011). Although the material has been collected in 2010, the actual date and where the species was introduced are not known.

Material examined

Brazil; Santa Catarina: Luís Alves (26°39′42.13″ S, 48°50′04.58″ W), on fruits of Musa sp. (banana); July 7, 2010; 3♀ (Milanez, J.M. col.) (Lima, E.F.B. det.) (ESALQ).

Morphological traits

Antennae eight-segmented; pedicel of antennal segment III simple (Fig 1b); simple sensilla on antennal segments III and IV, overlapping and thus appearing to be forked. Head and pronotum with conspicuous reticulation; ocellar region developed in a small elevation; post-ocular setae reduced; cheeks constricted behind eyes and at base (Fig 1c). Mesonotum completely divided by a median longitudinal line (Fig 1d). Forewings clear with dark bands (Fig 1e). Abdominal tergite II with stout tricoid processes laterally (Fig 1f). Abdominal segment X with expanded terminal setae (Fig 1g).

Acknowledgments

The Departamento de Sanidade Vegetal (DSV/MAPA) is acknowledged for the authorization to publish this report through opinion no. 181/2012/DQV. FAPESC (Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa e Inovação do Estado de Santa Catarina) is acknowledged for financial supoort.

Copyright information

© Sociedade Entomológica do Brasil 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Depto de Entomologia e Acarologia, Escola Superior de Agricultura “Luiz de Queiroz”Univ de São PauloPiracicabaBrasil
  2. 2.Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuária e Extensão Rural de Santa CatarinaEstação Experimental de ItajaíItajaíBrasil

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