Journal of NeuroVirology

, Volume 18, Issue 5, pp 341–353

14-3-3s are potential biomarkers for HIV-related neurodegeneration

Authors

  • Diana Morales
    • Department of Physiology, Pharmacology, and ToxicologyPonce School of Medicine and Health Sciences
  • Efthimios C. M. Skoulakis
    • Biomedical Sciences Research Center Alexander Fleming
    • Department of Physiology, Pharmacology, and ToxicologyPonce School of Medicine and Health Sciences
    • Psychology ProgramPonce School of Medicine and Health Sciences
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s13365-012-0121-2

Cite this article as:
Morales, D., Skoulakis, E.C.M. & Acevedo, S.F. J. Neurovirol. (2012) 18: 341. doi:10.1007/s13365-012-0121-2

Abstract

Over the last decade, it has become evident that 14-3-3 proteins are essential for primary cell functions. These proteins are abundant throughout the body, including the central nervous system and interact with other proteins in both cell cycle and apoptotic pathways. Examination of cerebral spinal fluid in humans suggests that 14-3-3s including 14-3-3ε (YWHAE) are up-regulated in several neurological diseases, and loss or duplication of the YWHAE gene leads to Miller–Dieker syndrome. The goal of this review is to examine the utility of 14-3-3s as a marker of human immune deficiency virus (HIV)-dependent neurodegeneration and also as a tool to track disease progression. To that end, we describe mechanisms implicating 14-3-3s in neurological diseases and summarize evidence of its interactions with HIV accessory and co-receptor proteins.

Keywords

14-3-3Hepatitis C virusNeurocognitionHIV accessory proteinsgp120VprVpuGPR15Nef

Abbreviations

ACD

AIDS dementia complex

AD

Alzheimer's disease

ADHD

Attention deficient hyperactivity disorder

AIDS

Acquired immunodeficiency virus

BAD

B-cell lymphoma 2 antagonist of cell death

Bax

Bcl-2-associated X

BBB

Blood–brain barrier

Bcl-XL

B-cell lymphoma-extra large

C. elegans

Caenorhabditis elegans

Cdc25

Cell division cycle phosphatase 25

CDKs

Cyclin-dependent protein kinases

CJD

Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease

CME

Cytomegalovirus encephalitis

CNS

Central nervous system

CRK

Viral oncogene causes increased tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins

CSF

Cerebral spinal fluid

CXCR4

CXC chemokine receptor 4

DCAF-1

DNA binding protein 1 and Cullin 4a-associated factor

FoxO

Forkhead transcription factor

Gp120

Glycoprotein 120

GPR15

G protein receptor 15

GPRs

G protein cell receptors

HAD

HIV-associated dementia

HADC

HIV-associated dementia complex

HAND

HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

HBMECs

Human brain microvascular endothelial cells

HCV

Hepatitis C virus

HEK293

Human embryonic kidney

Hela

Human cervical carcinoma

HepG2

Human hepatoma

HIV

Human immune deficiency virus

HIVE

HIV encephalitis

HMC

Human mesangial growth cells

HUVEC

Human umbilical vein endothelial cells

IL

Interleukin

ILK

Isolated lissencephaly

K2P

Potassium channel

LB

Lewy bodies

LIS1

Encodes subunit of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase 1B (PAFAH1B1)

MDS

Miller–Dieker syndrome

MS

Multiple sclerosis

MYO1C

Myosin-1C

Nef

Negative factor

PKA

Protein kinase A

PKC

Protein kinase C

Raf

Proto-oncogene serine/threonine-protein kinase

RNAi

RNA interference

S. pombe

Schizosaccharomyces pombe

siRNA

Single stranded RNA\

SIV

Simian immunodeficiency virus

TAU

Tubulin-associated unit

TUSC5

Tumor suppressor candidate 5

Vpr

Viral protein R

Vpu

Viral protein U

Ywhae/

Ywhae/14-3-3ε-deficient mice

YWHEA

14-3-3ε (human gene)

Copyright information

© Journal of NeuroVirology, Inc. 2012