Journal of NeuroVirology

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 303–312

Cerebrovascular risk factors and brain microstructural abnormalities on diffusion tensor images in HIV-infected individuals

Authors

    • University of Hawaii
    • Straub Clinics and Hospital
    • Hawaii Center for AIDS, John A. Burns School of MedicineUniversity of Hawaii at Manoa
  • Neda Jahanshad
    • Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, Departments of Neurology and PsychiatryUCLA School of Medicine
  • Aaron McMurtray
    • Ventura County Medical Center
  • Kalpana J. Kallianpur
    • University of Hawaii
  • Dominic C. Chow
    • University of Hawaii
  • Victor G. Valcour
    • University of California at San Francisco
  • Robert H. Paul
    • University of Missouri
  • Liron Marotz
    • University of Hawaii
  • Paul M. Thompson
    • Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, Departments of Neurology and PsychiatryUCLA School of Medicine
  • Cecilia M. Shikuma
    • University of Hawaii
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s13365-012-0106-1

Cite this article as:
Nakamoto, B.K., Jahanshad, N., McMurtray, A. et al. J. Neurovirol. (2012) 18: 303. doi:10.1007/s13365-012-0106-1

Abstract

HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder remains prevalent in HIV-infected individuals despite effective antiretroviral therapy. As these individuals age, comorbid cerebrovascular disease will likely impact cognitive function. Effective tools to study this impact are needed. This study used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize brain microstructural changes in HIV-infected individuals with and without cerebrovascular risk factors. Diffusion-weighted MRIs were obtained in 22 HIV-infected subjects aged 50 years or older (mean age = 58 years, standard deviation = 6 years; 19 males, three females). Tensors were calculated to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps. Statistical comparisons accounting for multiple comparisons were made between groups with and without cerebrovascular risk factors. Abnormal glucose metabolism (i.e., impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes mellitus) was associated with significantly higher MD (false discovery rate (FDR) critical p value = 0.008) and lower FA (FDR critical p value = 0.002) in the caudate and lower FA in the hippocampus (FDR critical p value = 0.004). Pearson correlations were performed between DTI measures in the caudate and hippocampus and age- and education-adjusted composite scores of global cognitive function, memory, and psychomotor speed. There were no detectable correlations between the neuroimaging measures and measures of cognition. In summary, we demonstrate that brain microstructural abnormalities are associated with abnormal glucose metabolism in the caudate and hippocampus of HIV-infected individuals. Deep gray matter structures and the hippocampus may be vulnerable in subjects with comorbid abnormal glucose metabolism, but our results should be confirmed in further studies.

Keywords

HIVCerebrovascular diseaseDiffusion tensor imaging

Glossary

Amyloid-beta

APOE ε4

Apolipoprotein epsilon 4

ATP-III

Adult Treatment Panel III

BDI-II

Beck Depression Inventory II

cART

Combination antiretroviral therapy

DBP

Diastolic blood pressure

DTI

Diffusion tensor imaging

FA

Fractional anisotropy

FDR

False discovery rate

IDE

Insulin-degrading enzyme

MD

Mean diffusivity

NPZ-3-mem

Age- and education-adjusted composite score of memory

NPZ-3-pm

Age- and education-adjusted composite score of psychomotor speed

NPZ-8

Age- and education-adjusted composite score of global cognitive function

OGTT

2-h oral glucose tolerance test

PET

Positron emission tomography

ROIs

Regions of interest

SBP

Systolic blood pressure

SD

Standard deviation

Copyright information

© Journal of NeuroVirology, Inc. 2012