Indian Pediatrics

, 48:373

Clinical profile and outcome of swine flu in Indian children

  • Rashmi Ranjan Das
  • Abdus Sami
  • Rakesh Lodha
  • Richa Jain
  • S. Broor
  • S. Kaushik
  • B. B. Singh
  • M. Ahmed
  • Rachna Seth
  • Sushil K. Kabra
Research Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s13312-011-0085-y

Cite this article as:
Das, R.R., Sami, A., Lodha, R. et al. Indian Pediatr (2011) 48: 373. doi:10.1007/s13312-011-0085-y

Abstract

Objective

To describe the clinical characteristics and outcome of Indian children infected with 2009 H1N1 influenza virus.

Study design

Retrospective chart review.

Setting

Outpatient department and hospitalized patients in a tertiary care hospital.

Methods

Clinical details of 85 children (positive for the 2009 H1N1 virus infection tested by real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction assay) were analyzed from medical charts.

Results

Of the 85 (55 boys) children positive for 2009 H1N1 virus infection, 64.7% were between 5 years to 16 years, and 35.3% were below 5 years age. The mean age of these children was 7.5±3.5 yr. Contact history was positive only in 22 (26%) cases. High grade fever was the most common symptom, followed by cough and rhinorrhea. Twenty-nine (34%) patients had an underlying co-morbid condition. Of the 34 patients who underwent chest radiography during evaluation, 18 children (52.9%) had findings consistent with lower respiratory tract infection. Antiviral therapy was initiated in 76 patients. Hospitalization was required in 30 (35.3%) children. Risk factors for hospitalization included underlying co-morbid condition, respiratory distress, vomiting, wheezing, diarrhea, hypotension and infiltrates/consolidation on chest radiograph. Mean length of hospitalization was 131±76 hours, irrespective of underlying disease. Three children developed Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and died.

Conclusions

Clinical features and routine laboratory investigations in children with swine origin influenza were non-specific. Children with co-morbid condition, respiratory distress, vomiting, wheezing, diarrhea, hypotension and infiltrates/consolidation on chest radiograph were at higher risk of hospitalization.

Key words

Acute lung injuryARDSH1N1 influenzaPandemic influenzaSwine origin influenza

Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Pediatrics 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rashmi Ranjan Das
    • 1
  • Abdus Sami
    • 1
  • Rakesh Lodha
    • 1
  • Richa Jain
    • 1
  • S. Broor
    • 2
  • S. Kaushik
    • 2
  • B. B. Singh
    • 2
  • M. Ahmed
    • 2
  • Rachna Seth
    • 1
  • Sushil K. Kabra
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsAll India Institute of Medical SciencesNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyAll India Institute of Medical SciencesNew DelhiIndia