AMBIO

, Volume 42, Issue 8, pp 937–950

Why are Prices in Wild Catch and Aquaculture Industries so Different?

  • Sebastián Villasante
  • David Rodríguez-González
  • Manel Antelo
  • Susana Rivero-Rodríguez
  • Joseba Lebrancón-Nieto
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s13280-013-0449-8

Cite this article as:
Villasante, S., Rodríguez-González, D., Antelo, M. et al. AMBIO (2013) 42: 937. doi:10.1007/s13280-013-0449-8

Abstract

Through a comparative analysis of prices in capture fisheries and aquaculture sectors, the objectives of this paper are a) to investigate three the trends in prices of forage catches to feed the aquaculture species, b) to analyze the amount of fish species need to feed aquaculture species in order to assess the level of efficiency in resource use, and c) to examine the degree of economic concentration either in wild-catch industry and aquaculture sectors. The results show that prices of cultivated species are higher than prices of the same species when harvested from the sea. We explain this fact by the interplay of three forces. First, the amount of wild fish to feed aquaculture species continues to improve over time. Second, the pressure of fishing activities has not been reduced since catches of most forage fishes are declining, which induce higher prices of capture species that feed aquaculture production. Third, the level of seafood market concentration is significantly higher in aquaculture than in wild catches, which generates higher prices in aquaculture.

Keywords

Global seafood marketsWild fisheriesAquaculturePricesEconomic concentration

Copyright information

© Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sebastián Villasante
    • 1
    • 2
  • David Rodríguez-González
    • 1
  • Manel Antelo
    • 1
  • Susana Rivero-Rodríguez
    • 1
  • Joseba Lebrancón-Nieto
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Economics and Business AdministrationUniversity of Santiago de CompostelaSantiago de CompostelaSpain
  2. 2.Campus do Mar, International Campus of ExcellenceVigoSpain