, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 1723-1728
Date: 23 Feb 2013

Hepatitis B virus infection status is an independent risk factor for multiple myeloma patients after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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Abstract

The purposes of this study were to evaluate the infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and its impact on survival and to provide a clinical reference for monitoring and treating HBV during and after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). A retrospective analysis of HBV infections was performed in 70 MM patients who received a sequential bortezomib-containing induction therapy and ASCT in our department from June 2006 to February 2012. Among the 70 patients in our study, 11 cases (15.7 %) were hepatitis B surface antigen positive (HBsAg+), and 23 cases (33.3 %) were hepatitis B core antibody positive (HBcAb+). Eight cases were HBsAg, hepatitis B e antibody (HBeAb), and HBcAb positive, while one case was HBsAg, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), and HBcAb positive. The median follow-up times for the HBsAg+ group and the HBsAg-negative (HBsAg−) group were 27.0 (7.6–85.2) months and 28.7 (7.1–111.0) months, respectively. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year overall survival rates of the HBsAg+ group were 90.9, 80.8, and 34.6 %, respectively, and the median survival time was 31.2 months (95 % CI, 24.8–37.6). The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year overall survival rates of the HBsAg− group were 98.2, 94, and 84.6 %, respectively, while the median survival time was not yet available. There was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.008) in the overall survival rate between the two groups. By Cox regression analysis, we found that the HBsAg+ status was a prognostic factor, which could independently influence the overall survival rate for ASCT. In conclusion, the HBsAg+ status is an independent risk factor for patients with MM receiving ASCT. The application of standard antiviral treatment might help to overcome this risk factor.

Juan Li and Junru Liu contributed equally in this study.