Protein & Cell

, Volume 3, Issue 5, pp 325–328

How carnivorous fungi use three-celled constricting rings to trap nematodes

Authors

  • Keke Liu
    • State Key Laboratory of Mycology, Institute of MicrobiologyChinese Academy of Sciences
  • Jianqing Tian
    • State Key Laboratory of Mycology, Institute of MicrobiologyChinese Academy of Sciences
  • Meichun Xiang
    • State Key Laboratory of Mycology, Institute of MicrobiologyChinese Academy of Sciences
    • State Key Laboratory of Mycology, Institute of MicrobiologyChinese Academy of Sciences
Mini-Review

DOI: 10.1007/s13238-012-2031-8

Cite this article as:
Liu, K., Tian, J., Xiang, M. et al. Protein Cell (2012) 3: 325. doi:10.1007/s13238-012-2031-8

Abstract

Predacious fungi form specialized hyphae structures to trap nematodes and other microscopic animals. Among the six kinds of trapping devices, the constricting ring is the only one that actively captures nematodes. When a nematode enters the aperture of the ring, which is formed by three cells, the cells rapidly triple their volume, close the aperture and hold the nematode in place. Hyphae then penetrate and consume the nematode. This paper reviews the data and hypotheses on conserving the evolution of constricting rings and their cytological and molecular mechanisms.

Keywords

constricting ring predatory mechanism

Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012