, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 28-37
Date: 09 Feb 2012

Horizontal transfer of microRNAs: molecular mechanisms and clinical applications

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Abstract

A new class of RNA regulatory genes known as microRNAs (miRNAs) has been found to introduce a whole new layer of gene regulation in eukaryotes. The intensive studies of the past several years have demonstrated that miRNAs are not only found intracellularly, but are also detectable outside cells, including in various body fluids (e.g. serum, plasma, saliva, urine and milk). This phenomenon raises questions about the biological function of such extracellular miRNAs. Substantial amounts of extracellular miRNAs are enclosed in small membranous vesicles (e.g. exosomes, shedding vesicles and apoptotic bodies) or packaged with RNA-binding proteins (e.g. high-density lipoprotein, Argonaute 2 and nucleophosmin 1). These miRNAs may function as secreted signaling molecules to influence the recipient cell phenotypes. Furthermore, secreted extracellular miRNAs may reflect molecular changes in the cells from which they are derived and can therefore potentially serve as diagnostic indicators of disease. Several studies also point to the potential application of siRNA/miRNA delivery as a new therapeutic strategy for treating diseases. In this review, we summarize what is known about the mechanism of miRNA secretion. In addition, we describe the pathophysiological roles of secreted miRNAs and their clinical potential as diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic drugs. We believe that miRNA transfer between cells will have a significant impact on biological research in the coming years.