, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 52-58
Date: 15 Dec 2012

Factors associated with better survival after surgery in metastatic breast cancer patients

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Abstract

Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC) and an intact primary have long been treated with systemic therapy alone. Local therapy is not considered unless for palliative reasons. However, several studies have suggested local treatment in the form of Surgery for the primary improves overall survival in certain groups of MBC patients. We evaluated the factors influencing the outcome in this group of patients. In a retrospective review of our prospective database, we identified the patients who presented with MBC and underwent surgery for primary tumour (2004–2009). Patients' surgical details and clinicopathological factors were reviewed. The overall survival of the MBC patients who underwent surgery was evaluated and compared depending on the various clinicopathological factors. Out of 196 patients with MBC, 48 underwent surgery of the primary tumor during their treatment course. Median overall survival was better in patients with young age (<=40 years), Estrogen receptor(ER) positive tumors (31.4 months vs 21.2 months), single metastatic site vs multiple metastatic sites (43.4 months vs 26.69 months). We also found that patients with low level of suspicion for metastases fared better than those with high level of suspicion (43.4 months vs 20.9 months). Our data analysis suggested that for MBC patients who undergo surgery, survival is significantly worse in patients with pathological T4 lesions and there is a trend towards better survival in younger patients and in those who have ER positive tumour, Her2neu negative tumour, single site of metastases and patients with low level of metastatic suspicion. However these factors need to be evaluated in a randomized trial comparing with patients who have not undergone surgery.