Journal of Cancer Education

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 744–747

Multicultural Media Outreach: Increasing Cancer Information Coverage in Minority Communities

  • James Alexander
  • Harry T. Kwon
  • Rachael Strecher
  • Jill Bartholomew
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s13187-013-0534-5

Cite this article as:
Alexander, J., Kwon, H.T., Strecher, R. et al. J Canc Educ (2013) 28: 744. doi:10.1007/s13187-013-0534-5

Abstract

Ethnic media can serve as an opportunity for cancer education and outreach to minority communities. The National Cancer Institute developed the Multicultural Media Outreach (MMO) program which utilizes an integrated approach of both traditional and social media to disseminate evidence-based cancer education information for minority communities. The MMO program is the contact point for multicultural media outlets seeking evidence-based cancer information, education materials, minority spokespersons, and news tailored to minority communities affected by cancer health disparities. MMO developed Lifelines®, a cancer education series that addresses cancer prevention, treatment, survivorship, clinical trials, and other cancer-related topics for African American, Hispanic, Asian American, American Indian, and Alaska Native audiences. Lifelines® content is disseminated through traditional media (radio, print, and television) as well as social media (web, Twitter, YouTube, and RSS feed). This article describes the MMO program and lessons learned to date.

Keywords

Cancer health disparities Ethnic media Minority and underserved Cancer education 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York (outside the USA)  2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Alexander
    • 1
  • Harry T. Kwon
    • 1
  • Rachael Strecher
    • 1
  • Jill Bartholomew
    • 1
  1. 1.Office of Communications and Education, National Cancer InstituteNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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