Wetlands

, Volume 31, Issue 6, pp 1227–1240

Environmental Influence on Flight Activity and Arrival Patterns of Aerial Colonizers of Temporary Ponds

  • Dani Boix
  • A. Katarina Magnusson
  • Stéphanie Gascón
  • Jordi Sala
  • D. Dudley Williams
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s13157-011-0234-z

Cite this article as:
Boix, D., Magnusson, A.K., Gascón, S. et al. Wetlands (2011) 31: 1227. doi:10.1007/s13157-011-0234-z
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Abstract

Arrival of aerial insect colonizers was studied (from April to July) using traps (artificial pools) installed adjacent to two temporary ponds in southern Ontario, Canada. The two ponds differed in the length of their hydroperiod: Pond I held water for 98 days, whereas Pond II held water for 34 days. The duration of the study was 15 weeks, during which two phases (wet and dry) were distinguished in each trap according to the presence or absence of water in their respective ponds. Atmospheric, habitat and pond variables were measured to determine the variations in the composition and in the richness and abundance of the aerial colonizers. Taxa captured arriving at the two traps by flight comprised 11 and 57 species of Hemiptera and Coleoptera, respectively. Multivariate analysis (CCA) and mixed linear effects models (LME and GLMM) showed that arrival phenology was more related to habitat condition (pond or phase) than to atmospheric conditions, although wind speed and minimum relative humidity appeared to play a secondary role. Arrival patterns were classifiable into four types (using GAM models), with all four observed in both ponds. While some species exhibited similar arrival patterns in both ponds, others did not.

Keywords

Temporary watersColeopteraHemipteraAtmospheric conditionsHabitat conditions

Copyright information

© Society of Wetland Scientists 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dani Boix
    • 1
  • A. Katarina Magnusson
    • 2
  • Stéphanie Gascón
    • 1
  • Jordi Sala
    • 1
  • D. Dudley Williams
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Aquatic EcologyFaculty of Sciences, Campus Montilivi, University of GironaGironaSpain
  2. 2.Surface and Groundwater Ecology Research Group, Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of Toronto at ScarboroughToronoCanada