Translational Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 131–139

Sociodemographic and social contextual predictors of multiple health behavior change: data from the Healthy Directions–Small Business study

  • Amy E. Harley
  • Amy L. Sapp
  • Yi Li
  • Miguel Marino
  • Lisa M. Quintiliani
  • Glorian Sorensen
Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s13142-013-0196-1

Cite this article as:
Harley, A.E., Sapp, A.L., Li, Y. et al. Behav. Med. Pract. Policy Res. (2013) 3: 131. doi:10.1007/s13142-013-0196-1

ABSTRACT

Multiple modifiable health behaviors contribute to the chronic diseases that are the leading causes of death in the USA. Disparities for meeting recommended health behavior guidelines exist across occupational classes and socioeconomic levels. The purpose of this paper was to investigate sociodemographic and social contextual predictors of multiple health behavior change in a worksite intervention. We analyzed data on four diet and exercise variables from an intervention trial with worksite-level randomization. Eight hundred forty-one employees had complete data from baseline (response rate = 84 %) and follow-up surveys (response rate = 77 %). Multilevel logistic regression estimated associations between least absolute shrinkage and selection operator-selected sociodemographic and social contextual predictor variables and the multiple health behavior change outcome (changing 2+ versus 0 behaviors). Gender, being married/partnered, and perceived discrimination were significantly associated with multiple health behavior change. Sociodemographic and social contextual factors predict multiple health behavior change and could inform the design and delivery of worksite interventions targeting multiple health behaviors.

KEYWORDS

Behavioral researchDietExerciseHealth promotionPrimary preventionWorksite

Copyright information

© Society of Behavioral Medicine 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amy E. Harley
    • 1
  • Amy L. Sapp
    • 2
  • Yi Li
    • 3
  • Miguel Marino
    • 3
  • Lisa M. Quintiliani
    • 4
  • Glorian Sorensen
    • 5
  1. 1.Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, Center for Urban Population HealthUniversity of Wisconsin-MilwaukeeMilwaukeeUSA
  2. 2.Department of Society, Human Development, and HealthHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of BiostatisticsHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  4. 4.Boston University Medical CenterBostonUSA
  5. 5.Department of Society, Human Development, and Health; Center for Community-Based Research, Dana-Farber Cancer InstituteHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA