Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 677–679

Isolation and development of 15 new, polymorphic microsatellite loci for an unusual, endemic African earwig (Hemimerus vosseleri)

Authors

  • K. C. Murdoch
    • Department of Biological, Chemical, and Physical SciencesRoosevelt University
    • The Field Museum
  • J. D. Keyyu
    • Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute
  • E. D. Karimuribo
    • Department of Veterinary Medicine and Public HealthSokoine University of Agriculture
  • K. A. Feldheim
    • The Field Museum
    • Department of Biological, Chemical, and Physical SciencesRoosevelt University
    • The Field Museum
Technical Note

DOI: 10.1007/s12686-012-9621-x

Cite this article as:
Murdoch, K.C., Keyyu, J.D., Karimuribo, E.D. et al. Conservation Genet Resour (2012) 4: 677. doi:10.1007/s12686-012-9621-x

Abstract

Eighteen microsatellite loci were isolated from the Hemimerus vosseleri earwig, an insect species endemic to the Eastern Arc Mountains, and that lives on African Giant Pouched Rat (Cricetomys gambianus). Alleles ranged between two and 12 per locus, with expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.185 to 0.883 and observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.200 to 0.750. Fifteen of 18 loci were polymorphic. These microsatellite markers will be used to study the population structure of Hemimerus vosseleri among different rat hosts, which will likely enhance the conservation of this unique and unusual rodent-insect partnership.

Keywords

Earwig Hemimerus vosseleri Microsatellite markers Mutualism Tanzania

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012