Environmental Earth Sciences

, Volume 71, Issue 1, pp 163–181

Radar interferometry techniques for the study of ground subsidence phenomena: a review of practical issues through cases in Spain

  • R. Tomás
  • R. Romero
  • J. Mulas
  • J. J. Marturià
  • J. J. Mallorquí
  • J. M. Lopez-Sanchez
  • G. Herrera
  • F. Gutiérrez
  • P. J. González
  • J. Fernández
  • S. Duque
  • A. Concha-Dimas
  • G. Cocksley
  • C. Castañeda
  • D. Carrasco
  • P. Blanco
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12665-013-2422-z

Cite this article as:
Tomás, R., Romero, R., Mulas, J. et al. Environ Earth Sci (2014) 71: 163. doi:10.1007/s12665-013-2422-z

Abstract

Subsidence related to multiple natural and human-induced processes affects an increasing number of areas worldwide. Although this phenomenon may involve surface deformation with 3D displacement components, negative vertical movement, either progressive or episodic, tends to dominate. Over the last decades, differential SAR interferometry (DInSAR) has become a very useful remote sensing tool for accurately measuring the spatial and temporal evolution of surface displacements over broad areas. This work discusses the main advantages and limitations of addressing active subsidence phenomena by means of DInSAR techniques from an end-user point of view. Special attention is paid to the spatial and temporal resolution, the precision of the measurements, and the usefulness of the data. The presented analysis is focused on DInSAR results exploitation of various ground subsidence phenomena (groundwater withdrawal, soil compaction, mining subsidence, evaporite dissolution subsidence, and volcanic deformation) with different displacement patterns in a selection of subsidence areas in Spain. Finally, a cost comparative study is performed for the different techniques applied.

Keywords

Subsidence DInSAR Settlement Remote sensing Spain Technique-cost 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Tomás
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Romero
    • 3
  • J. Mulas
    • 2
    • 4
  • J. J. Marturià
    • 5
  • J. J. Mallorquí
    • 6
  • J. M. Lopez-Sanchez
    • 2
    • 7
  • G. Herrera
    • 2
    • 4
  • F. Gutiérrez
    • 8
  • P. J. González
    • 9
  • J. Fernández
    • 10
  • S. Duque
    • 14
  • A. Concha-Dimas
    • 5
  • G. Cocksley
    • 11
  • C. Castañeda
    • 12
  • D. Carrasco
    • 3
  • P. Blanco
    • 13
  1. 1.Departamento de Ingeniería Civil, Escuela Politécnica SuperiorUniversidad de AlicanteAlicanteSpain
  2. 2.Unidad Asociada de investigación IGME-UA de movimientos del terreno mediante interferometría radar (UNIRAD)Universidad de AlicanteAlicanteSpain
  3. 3.INDRA EspacioMadridSpain
  4. 4.Geohazards Remote Sensing LaboratoryGrupo de Riesgos Geológicos, Instituto Geológico y Minero de EspañaMadridSpain
  5. 5.Institut Geològic de CatalunyaBarcelonaSpain
  6. 6.Remote Sensing Lab, Departament de Teoria del Senyal I ComunicacionsUniversitat Politècnica de CatalunyaBarcelonaSpain
  7. 7.Departamento de Física, Ingeniería de Sistemas y Teoría de la Señal (DFISTS), Escuela Politécnica SuperiorUniversidad de AlicanteAlicanteSpain
  8. 8.Department of Earth SciencesUniversity of ZaragozaZaragozaSpain
  9. 9.Department of Earth SciencesUniversity of Western Ontario, Biological and Geological Sciences BuildingLondonCanada
  10. 10.Institute of Geosciences (CSIC-UCM), Facultad de Ciencias MatemáticasMadridSpain
  11. 11.Altamira InformationBarcelonaSpain
  12. 12.Estación Experimental de Aula Dei (EEAD-CSIC)ZaragozaSpain
  13. 13.Institut Cartografic de CatalunyaBarcelonaSpain
  14. 14.German Aerospace Center (DLR), Remote Sensing Technology InstituteWeßlingGermany

Personalised recommendations