Neurotoxicity Research

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 49–56

New Strategies in Neuroprotection and Neurorepair

  • Marta C. Antonelli
  • Gilles J. Guillemin
  • Rita Raisman-Vozari
  • Elaine A. Del-Bel
  • Michael Aschner
  • Michael A. Collins
  • Yousef Tizabi
  • Rosario Moratalla
  • Adrian K. West
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12640-011-9265-8

Cite this article as:
Antonelli, M.C., Guillemin, G.J., Raisman-Vozari, R. et al. Neurotox Res (2012) 21: 49. doi:10.1007/s12640-011-9265-8

Abstract

There are currently few clinical strategies in place, which provide effective neuroprotection and repair, despite an intense international effort over the past decades. One possible explanation for this is that a deeper understanding is required of how endogenous mechanisms act to confer neuroprotection. This mini-review reports the proceedings of a recent workshop “Neuroprotection and Neurorepair: New Strategies” (Iguazu Falls, Misiones, Argentina, April 11–13, 2011, Satellite Symposium of the V Neurotoxicity Society Meeting, 2011) in which four areas of active research were identified to have the potential to generate new insights into this field. Topics discussed were (i) metallothionein and other multipotent neuroprotective molecules; (ii) oxidative stress and their signal mediated pathways in neuroregeneration; (iii) neurotoxins in glial cells, and (iv) drugs of abuse with neuroprotective effects.

Keywords

NeuroprotectionOxidative stressMetallothioneinGliaCannabinoidsAlcohol

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marta C. Antonelli
    • 1
  • Gilles J. Guillemin
    • 2
  • Rita Raisman-Vozari
    • 3
  • Elaine A. Del-Bel
    • 4
  • Michael Aschner
    • 5
  • Michael A. Collins
    • 6
  • Yousef Tizabi
    • 7
  • Rosario Moratalla
    • 8
  • Adrian K. West
    • 9
  1. 1.Instituto de Química y Fisicoquímica Biológicas (UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y BioquímicaUniversidad de Buenos AiresBuenos AiresArgentina
  2. 2.University of New South Wales, School of Medical Sciences, Neuroinflammation GroupNSWAustralia
  3. 3.INSERM, UMRS 975, CRICM, Experimental Therapeutics of NeurodegenerationHôpital de la SalpêtrièreParisFrance
  4. 4.Department of PhysiologySchool of Odontology, FORPRibeirão PretoBrazil
  5. 5.Departments of Pediatrics, Pharmacology, and the Kennedy Center for Research on Human DevelopmentVanderbilt University Medical CenterNashvilleUSA
  6. 6.Department of Molecular Pharmacology & TherapeuticsLoyola University School of MedicineMaywoodUSA
  7. 7.Department of Pharmacology, College of MedicineHoward UniversityWashingtonUSA
  8. 8.Instituto Cajal, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, CSIC, 28002 and CIBERNED ISCIIIMadridSpain
  9. 9.Menzies Research InstituteUniversity of TasmaniaHobartAustralia