Low serum carotenoids are associated with a decline in walking speed in older women

  • N. Alipanah
  • R. Varadhan
  • K. Sun
  • L. Ferrucci
  • L. P. Fried
  • Richard D. Semba
Low Serum Carotenoids

DOI: 10.1007/s12603-009-0053-6

Cite this article as:
Alipanah, N., Varadhan, R., Sun, K. et al. J Nutr Health Aging (2009) 13: 170. doi:10.1007/s12603-009-0053-6

Abstract

Background and Objectives

Walking speed is an important measure of physical performance that is predictive of disability and mortality. The relationship of dietary factors to changes in physical performance has not been well characterized in older adults. The aim was to determine whether total serum carotenoid concentrations, a marker for fruit and vegetable intake, and serum selenium are related to changes in walking speed in older women.

Subjects and Methods

The relationship between total serum carotenoids and selenium measured at baseline, 12, and 24 months follow-up and walking speed assessed at baseline and every six months for 36 months was examined in 687 moderately to severely disabled women, 65 years or older, living in the community.

Results

Mean total serum carotenoids were associated with mean walking speed over three years of follow-up (P = 0.0003) and rate of change of walking speed (P = 0.007) in multivariate linear regression models adjusting for age, body mass index, and chronic diseases. Mean serum selenium was associated with mean walking speed over three years of follow-up (P = 0.0003) but not with the rate of change of walking speed (P = 0.26).

Conclusions

These findings suggest that a higher fruit and vegetable intake, as indicated by higher total serum carotenoid concentrations, may be protective against a decline in walking speed in older women.

Key words

Agingcarotenoidsdisabilitywalking speedwomen

Copyright information

© Serdi and Springer Verlag France 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Alipanah
    • 1
  • R. Varadhan
    • 1
  • K. Sun
    • 1
  • L. Ferrucci
    • 2
  • L. P. Fried
    • 1
  • Richard D. Semba
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Johns Hopkins Medical InstitutionsBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Longitudinal Studies Section, Clinical Research BranchNational Institute on AgingBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.BaltimoreUSA