Original Article Chemistry and Biochemistry

Fisheries Science

, Volume 79, Issue 3, pp 487-494

First online:

Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.

Evaluation of the bioactivities of water-soluble extracts from twelve deep-sea jellyfish species

  • Takenori KawabataAffiliated withTokyo University of Marine Science and Technology
  • , Dhugal J. LindsayAffiliated withJapan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)
  • , Minoru KitamuraAffiliated withJapan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)
  • , Satoshi KonishiAffiliated withJapan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)
  • , Jun NishikawaAffiliated withAtmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo
  • , Shuhei NishidaAffiliated withAtmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo
  • , Michiya KamioAffiliated withTokyo University of Marine Science and Technology
  • , Hiroshi NagaiAffiliated withTokyo University of Marine Science and Technology Email author 

Abstract

Many polypeptides isolated from shallow water cnidarian species have been utilized as valuable biochemical tools in both basic and applied biological sciences. Deepwater cnidarian species might be another potential resource for novel biochemical tools. However, because of limited access to cnidarian samples from deep-sea environments, bioactive polypeptides have never before been reported from this group. In this study, we collected twelve deep-sea jellyfish species (nine hydrozoans and three scyphozoans) using a plankton net that was specially designed for collecting deep-sea organisms, and prepared water-soluble extracts, presumably containing polypeptides, of these jellyfishes. The extracts were subjected to cytotoxicity, hemolytic activity, and crustacean lethal toxicity tests. In the cytotoxicity test, six out of the nine tested hydrozoan species showed activity. In the hemolytic activity test, only three hydrozoans showed activity and none of the scyphozoan jellyfishes showed activity. In the crustacean lethality test, two hydrozoan jellyfishes and all three of the tested scyphozoan jellyfishes showed lethal activity. These results revealed a high incidence of water-soluble bioactive substances occurring in these deep-sea jellyfishes. Furthermore, all the heat-treated and the methanol-treated crude jellyfish extracts lost their bioactivities. Thus, it is likely that the bioactive compounds in the water-soluble extracts were unstable polypeptides (proteins). This is the first published report on bioactivities in extracts from deep-sea jellyfishes.

Keywords

Jellyfish Cnidarian Deep-sea Bioactivity Natural product Toxin Bioresource