Netherlands Heart Journal

, Volume 21, Issue 5, pp 238–244

Coronary microcirculatory dysfunction is associated with left ventricular dysfunction during follow-up after STEMI

Authors

    • Department of CardiologyAcademic Medical Centre—University of Amsterdam
  • K. D. Sjauw
    • Department of CardiologyAcademic Medical Centre—University of Amsterdam
  • Z. Y. Yong
    • Department of CardiologyAcademic Medical Centre—University of Amsterdam
  • J. D. E. Haeck
    • Department of CardiologyAcademic Medical Centre—University of Amsterdam
  • M. M. Vis
    • Department of CardiologyAcademic Medical Centre—University of Amsterdam
  • K. T. Koch
    • Department of CardiologyAcademic Medical Centre—University of Amsterdam
  • J. G. P. Tijssen
    • Department of CardiologyAcademic Medical Centre—University of Amsterdam
  • R. J. de Winter
    • Department of CardiologyAcademic Medical Centre—University of Amsterdam
  • J. P. S. Henriques
    • Department of CardiologyAcademic Medical Centre—University of Amsterdam
  • J. J. Piek
    • Department of CardiologyAcademic Medical Centre—University of Amsterdam
  • J. BaanJr.
    • Department of CardiologyAcademic Medical Centre—University of Amsterdam
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12471-013-0382-2

Cite this article as:
Remmelink, M., Sjauw, K.D., Yong, Z.Y. et al. Neth Heart J (2013) 21: 238. doi:10.1007/s12471-013-0382-2
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Abstract

Background

Coronary microvascular resistance is increased after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), which may be related in part to changed left ventricular (LV) dynamics. Therefore we studied the coronary microcirculation in relation to systolic and diastolic LV function after STEMI.

Methods

The study cohort consisted of 12 consecutive patients, all treated with primary PCI for a first anterior wall STEMI. At 4 months, we assessed pressure-volume loops. Subsequently, we measured intracoronary pressure and flow velocity and calculated coronary microvascular resistance. Infarct size and LV mass were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging.

Results

Patients with an impaired systolic LV function due to a larger myocardial infarction showed a higher baseline average peak flow velocity (APV) than the other patients (26 ± 7 versus 17 ± 5 cm/s, p = 0.003, respectively), and showed an impaired variable microvascular resistance index (2.1 ± 1.0 versus 4.1 ± 1.3 mmHg cm−1∙s−1, p = 0.003, respectively). Impaired diastolic relaxation time was inversely correlated with hyperaemic APV (r = −0.56, p = 0.003) and positively correlated with hyperaemic microvascular resistance (r = 0.48, p = 0.01). LV dilatation was associated with a reduced variable microvascular resistance index (r = 0.78, p = 0.006).

Conclusion

A larger anterior myocardial infarction results in impaired LV performance associated with reduced coronary microvascular resistance variability, in particular due to higher coronary blood flow at baseline in these compromised left ventricles.

Keywords

Acute myocardial infarctionIntracoronary hemodynamicsPercutaneous coronary interventionPressure-volume relations

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2013

Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited.