International Journal of Social Robotics

, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 409–417

When a Robot’s Group Membership Matters

Anthropomorphization of Robots as a Function of Social Categorization

Authors

    • Department of Psychology, Center of Excellence in Cognitive Interaction TechnologyUniversity of Bielefeld
  • Friederike Eyssel
    • Department of Psychology, Center of Excellence in Cognitive Interaction TechnologyUniversity of Bielefeld
  • Simon Bobinger
    • Department of Psychology, Center of Excellence in Cognitive Interaction TechnologyUniversity of Bielefeld
  • Maria Neufeld
    • Department of PsychologyDresden University of Technology
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12369-013-0197-8

Cite this article as:
Kuchenbrandt, D., Eyssel, F., Bobinger, S. et al. Int J of Soc Robotics (2013) 5: 409. doi:10.1007/s12369-013-0197-8
  • 362 Views

Abstract

Previous work has documented that humans categorize robots as members of different social groups, thereby using socially relevant cues such as a robot’s alleged gender or nationality. Importantly, these social categorization processes affect impressions people form about robots. In an experiment with N=45 participants, we utilized a minimal-group paradigm and tested whether categorizing the humanoid robot NAO as an in-group member vs. an out-group member based on socially non-relevant features would result in higher levels of anthropomorphism and more positive evaluations of the robot. Innovatively, to assess anthropomorphism, we utilized an implicit measurement procedure. Results support our hypotheses: Perceived in-group membership with the robot resulted in a greater extent of anthropomorphic inferences about the robot and more positive evaluations. Moreover, compared to the out-group condition, participants who perceived NAO as an in-group member showed greater willingness to interact with robots in general.

Keywords

AnthropomorphismHuman-robot-interactionMinimal-group paradigmRobot evaluation

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013