The Cerebellum

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 386–410

Consensus Paper: Language and the Cerebellum: an Ongoing Enigma

  • Peter Mariën
  • Herman Ackermann
  • Michael Adamaszek
  • Caroline H. S. Barwood
  • Alan Beaton
  • John Desmond
  • Elke De Witte
  • Angela J. Fawcett
  • Ingo Hertrich
  • Michael Küper
  • Maria Leggio
  • Cherie Marvel
  • Marco Molinari
  • Bruce E. Murdoch
  • Roderick I. Nicolson
  • Jeremy D. Schmahmann
  • Catherine J. Stoodley
  • Markus Thürling
  • Dagmar Timmann
  • Ellen Wouters
  • Wolfram Ziegler
Consensus Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s12311-013-0540-5

Cite this article as:
Mariën, P., Ackermann, H., Adamaszek, M. et al. Cerebellum (2014) 13: 386. doi:10.1007/s12311-013-0540-5

Abstract

In less than three decades, the concept “cerebellar neurocognition” has evolved from a mere afterthought to an entirely new and multifaceted area of neuroscientific research. A close interplay between three main strands of contemporary neuroscience induced a substantial modification of the traditional view of the cerebellum as a mere coordinator of autonomic and somatic motor functions. Indeed, the wealth of current evidence derived from detailed neuroanatomical investigations, functional neuroimaging studies with healthy subjects and patients and in-depth neuropsychological assessment of patients with cerebellar disorders shows that the cerebellum has a cardinal role to play in affective regulation, cognitive processing, and linguistic function. Although considerable progress has been made in models of cerebellar function, controversy remains regarding the exact role of the “linguistic cerebellum” in a broad variety of nonmotor language processes. This consensus paper brings together a range of different viewpoints and opinions regarding the contribution of the cerebellum to language function. Recent developments and insights in the nonmotor modulatory role of the cerebellum in language and some related disorders will be discussed. The role of the cerebellum in speech and language perception, in motor speech planning including apraxia of speech, in verbal working memory, in phonological and semantic verbal fluency, in syntax processing, in the dynamics of language production, in reading and in writing will be addressed. In addition, the functional topography of the linguistic cerebellum and the contribution of the deep nuclei to linguistic function will be briefly discussed. As such, a framework for debate and discussion will be offered in this consensus paper.

Keywords

CerebellumLanguageSpeechSpeech perceptionApraxia of speechWorking memoryVerbal fluencySyntaxPhonologySemanticsAphasiaImagingAgraphiaDyslexiaFunctional topographyImagingfMRISPECT

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Mariën
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Herman Ackermann
    • 4
  • Michael Adamaszek
    • 5
  • Caroline H. S. Barwood
    • 6
  • Alan Beaton
    • 7
  • John Desmond
    • 8
  • Elke De Witte
    • 1
  • Angela J. Fawcett
    • 9
  • Ingo Hertrich
    • 4
  • Michael Küper
    • 10
  • Maria Leggio
    • 11
    • 12
  • Cherie Marvel
    • 8
  • Marco Molinari
    • 12
  • Bruce E. Murdoch
    • 6
  • Roderick I. Nicolson
    • 13
  • Jeremy D. Schmahmann
    • 14
  • Catherine J. Stoodley
    • 15
  • Markus Thürling
    • 10
  • Dagmar Timmann
    • 10
  • Ellen Wouters
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wolfram Ziegler
    • 16
    • 17
  1. 1.Department of Clinical and Experimental Neurolinguistics, CLINBrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyZNA Middelheim General HospitalAntwerpBelgium
  3. 3.Vlaams Academisch Centrum (VLAC)Advanced Studies Institute of the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Sciences and the ArtsBrusselsBelgium
  4. 4.Department of General Neurology, Center of NeurologyHertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of TübingenTübingenGermany
  5. 5.Center of Neurologic Rehabilitation, Cognitive NeurophysiologyUniversity of LeipzigBennewitzGermany
  6. 6.Centre for Neurogenic Communication Disorders Research, School of Health and Rehabilitation SciencesThe University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia
  7. 7.Department of PsychologySwansea University and Department of PsychologyAberystwythUK
  8. 8.Department of NeurologyJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  9. 9.Centre for Child ResearchUniversity of SwanseaSwanseaUK
  10. 10.Department of NeurologyUniversity of Duisburg-EssenEssenGermany
  11. 11.Department of PsychologySapienza University of RomeRomeItaly
  12. 12.I.R.C.C.S. Santa Lucia FoundationRomeItaly
  13. 13.Department of PsychologyThe University of SheffieldSheffieldUK
  14. 14.Ataxia Unit, Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology Unit, Laboratory for Neuroanatomy and Cerebellar NeurobiologyDepartment of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  15. 15.Department of PsychologyAmerican University WashingtonWashingtonUSA
  16. 16.Clinical Neuropsychology Research GroupClinic for Neuropsychology, City HospitalMunichGermany
  17. 17.Institute of Phonetics and Speech ProcessingLudwig-Maximilian UniversityMunichGermany