School Mental Health

, Volume 1, Issue 2, pp 89–102

Supportive and Controlling Parental Involvement as Predictors of Children’s Academic Achievement: Relations to Children’s ADHD Symptoms and Parenting Stress

  • Maria A. Rogers
  • Judith Wiener
  • Imola Marton
  • Rosemary Tannock
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s12310-009-9010-0

Cite this article as:
Rogers, M.A., Wiener, J., Marton, I. et al. School Mental Health (2009) 1: 89. doi:10.1007/s12310-009-9010-0

Abstract

This study investigated the role of parenting stress, the parental involvement style, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in predicting academic achievement in 8- to 12-year-old children. Guided by the Family–School Relationships Model path analysis was used to compare the effects of a controlling versus supportive style of parental involvement in relation to children's learning. Results revealed that high levels of parenting stress were associated with the use of more controlling strategies regarding children’s academics, whereas lower stress was associated with a more supportive style of involvement. Controlling parental involvement was associated with more parent-rated symptoms of ADHD and lower academic achievement in children, while supportive involvement was associated with fewer parent-rated ADHD symptoms and higher achievement. The relation between both styles of parental involvement and academic achievement was accounted for by children’s inattention, but not hyperactivity/impulsivity, in the home. These findings demonstrate the combined risk of parenting stress, controlling parental involvement, and children’s inattentive behaviors for poor achievement in children.

Keywords

Parental involvementParenting stressAttention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)InattentionAcademic achievement

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria A. Rogers
    • 1
  • Judith Wiener
    • 2
  • Imola Marton
    • 3
  • Rosemary Tannock
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Neurosciences and Mental Health Research ProgramThe Hospital for Sick ChildrenTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Department of Human Development and Applied PsychologyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Department of Psychological ServicesToronto District School BoardTorontoCanada
  4. 4.Neurosciences and Mental Health Research ProgramThe Hospital for Sick ChildrenTorontoCanada