Articles

The Journal of Microbiology

, Volume 46, Issue 5, pp 491-501

First online:

Bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryal diversity in the intestines of Korean people

  • Young-Do NamAffiliated withBiological Resources Center, KRIBBUniversity of Science and Technology
  • , Ho-Won ChangAffiliated withBiological Resources Center, KRIBB
  • , Kyoung-Ho KimAffiliated withBiological Resources Center, KRIBB
  • , Seong Woon RohAffiliated withBiological Resources Center, KRIBBUniversity of Science and Technology
  • , Min-Soo KimAffiliated withBiological Resources Center, KRIBBUniversity of Science and Technology
  • , Mi-Ja JungAffiliated withBiological Resources Center, KRIBB
  • , Si-Woo LeeAffiliated withKorea Institute of Oriental Medicine
  • , Jong-Yeol KimAffiliated withKorea Institute of Oriental Medicine
  • , Jung-Hoon YoonAffiliated withBiological Resources Center, KRIBB
    • , Jin-Woo BaeAffiliated withBiological Resources Center, KRIBBUniversity of Science and TechnologyEnvironmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Gyeongsang National University Email author 

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

The bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryal diversity in fecal samples from ten Koreans were analyzed and compared by using the PCR-fingerprinting method, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The bacteria all belonged to the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla, which were known to be the dominant bacterial species in the human intestine. Most of the archaeal sequences belonged to the methane-producing archaea but several halophilic archarea-related sequences were also detected unexpectedly. While a small number of eukaryal sequences were also detected upon DGGE analysis, these sequences were related to fungi and stramenopiles (Blastocystis hominis). With regard to the bacterial and archaeal DGGE analysis, all ten samples had one and two prominent bands, respectively, but many individual-specific bands were also observed. However, only five of the ten samples had small eukaryal DGGE bands and none of these bands was observed in all five samples. Unweighted pair group method and arithmetic averages clustering algorithm (UPGMA) clustering analysis revealed that the archaeal and bacterial communities in the ten samples had relatively higher relatedness (the average Dice coefficient values were 68.9 and 59.2% for archaea and bacteria, respectively) but the eukaryal community showed low relatedness (39.6%).

Keywords

human intestinal microbes Bacteria Archaea Eukaryote DGGE UPGMA