Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine

, Volume 16, Issue 6, pp 363–368

Metabolic syndrome and depressive symptoms among Japanese men and women

Authors

    • Department of Nutrition and Life Science, Faculty of Life Science and BiotechnologyFukuyama University
  • Yumi Matsushita
    • Department of Epidemiology and International Health, International Clinical Research CenterNational Center for Global Health and Medicine
  • Akiko Nanri
    • Department of Epidemiology and International Health, International Clinical Research CenterNational Center for Global Health and Medicine
  • Tetsuya Mizoue
    • Department of Epidemiology and International Health, International Clinical Research CenterNational Center for Global Health and Medicine
Regular Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12199-011-0206-1

Cite this article as:
Kimura, Y., Matsushita, Y., Nanri, A. et al. Environ Health Prev Med (2011) 16: 363. doi:10.1007/s12199-011-0206-1

Abstract

Objectives

Evidence is limited on the relation between metabolic syndrome and depressive symptoms. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between metabolic syndrome and depressive symptoms in a Japanese working population.

Methods

The study subjects comprised 458 municipal employees (age range 21–67 years) from two municipal offices in Japan. A modified version of the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III was used to define metabolic syndrome. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES_D) scale.

Results

Depressive symptoms (CES_D ≥ 16) in both the male and female subjects were not significantly associated with metabolic syndrome nor with each component of metabolic syndrome. In men, high fasting glucose was associated with increased prevalence of severe depressive state (CES_D ≥ 23).

Conclusions

Metabolic syndrome may not be associated with depressive status among Japanese employees.

Keywords

Metabolic syndromeDepressive symptomsCES_DNCEP-ATP IIIHyperglycemia

Copyright information

© The Japanese Society for Hygiene 2011