Radiological Physics and Technology

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 97–103

Polarity effect in commercial ionization chambers used in photon beams with small fields

Authors

    • Department of RadiologyHoshigaoka Koseinenkin Hospital
  • Kichiro Koshida
    • Department of Quantum Medical TechnologyKanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences
  • Hidekazu Nambu
    • Department of RadiologyNara Hospital Kinki University Medical School
  • Kosuke Matsubara
    • Department of Quantum Medical TechnologyKanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences
  • Hiroshi Takahashi
    • Department of RadiologyHoshigaoka Koseinenkin Hospital
  • Hiroshi Okuda
    • Department of RadiologyHoshigaoka Koseinenkin Hospital
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12194-008-0050-1

Cite this article as:
Shimono, T., Koshida, K., Nambu, H. et al. Radiol Phys Technol (2009) 2: 97. doi:10.1007/s12194-008-0050-1

Abstract

Ionization chambers are the instruments of choice for use in photon dosimetry. Ionization chambers together with radiographic films represent the best detectors for measurement of dose distribution for a quality assurance (QA) program in intensity-modulated radiotheraphy (IMRT). The polarity effect was investigated for seven different commercially available ionization chambers. This study concentrated on measuring the dependence of the polarity effect at various energies, and for various field size, ionization chamber, and electrometer combinations. Of the seven chambers, CC01, PTW23323, and PTW31006 had the largest polarity effect for small field sizes. The materials of the central electrode of these three chambers were steel or air-equivalent plastic C-552. The magnitude of the polarity effect was shown to be strongly dependent on the material of the collecting electrode. This polarity effect dependence was observed for the ionization chambers and small field sizes studied.

Keywords

Polarity effectIonization chamberSmall field

Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Radiological Technology and Japan Society of Medical Physics 2008