Cell Stress and Chaperones

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 123–141

Caught with their PAMPs down? The extracellular signalling actions of molecular chaperones are not due to microbial contaminants

  • Brian Henderson
  • Stuart K. Calderwood
  • Anthony R. M. Coates
  • Irun Cohen
  • Willem van Eden
  • Thomas Lehner
  • A. Graham Pockley
Mini Review

DOI: 10.1007/s12192-009-0137-6

Cite this article as:
Henderson, B., Calderwood, S.K., Coates, A.R.M. et al. Cell Stress and Chaperones (2010) 15: 123. doi:10.1007/s12192-009-0137-6

Abstract

In recent years, it has been hypothesised that a new signalling system may exist in vertebrates in which secreted molecular chaperones form a dynamic continuum between the cellular stress response and corresponding homeostatic physiological mechanisms. This hypothesis seems to be supported by the finding that many molecular chaperones are released from cells and act as extracellular signals for a range of cells. However, this nascent field of biological research seems to suffer from an excessive criticism that the biological activities of molecular chaperones are due to undefined components of the microbial expression hosts used to generate recombinant versions of these proteins. In this article, a number of the proponents of the cell signalling actions of molecular chaperones take this criticism head-on. They show that sufficient evidence exists to support fully the hypothesis that molecular chaperones have cell–cell signalling actions that are likely to be part of the homeostatic mechanism of the vertebrate.

Keywords

Heat shock proteinsEndotoxinInnate immunityAdaptive immunityInflammationImmunoregulation

Copyright information

© Cell Stress Society International 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian Henderson
    • 1
  • Stuart K. Calderwood
    • 2
  • Anthony R. M. Coates
    • 3
  • Irun Cohen
    • 4
  • Willem van Eden
    • 5
  • Thomas Lehner
    • 6
  • A. Graham Pockley
    • 7
  1. 1.Division of Microbial Diseases, UCL-Eastman Dental InstituteUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical CenterHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  3. 3.Centre of Infection, Division of Cellular and Molecular MedicineSt. George’s University of LondonLondonUK
  4. 4.Department of ImmunologyThe Weizmann Institute of ScienceRehovotIsrael
  5. 5.Institute of Infectious Diseases and ImmunologyUtrecht UniversityUtrechtThe Netherlands
  6. 6.Kings College London at Guy’s HospitalLondonUK
  7. 7.Immunobiology Research Group, The Medical SchoolUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK