International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 97, Issue 2, pp 240–245

Primary testicular lymphoma: experience with 13 cases and literature review

Authors

  • Chu Wang
    • Department of Urology, Peking Union Medical College HospitalChinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College (CAMS & PUMC)
  • Hai Wang
    • Department of Urology, Peking Union Medical College HospitalChinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College (CAMS & PUMC)
  • Qinghai Wang
    • Department of Urology, Peking Union Medical College HospitalChinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College (CAMS & PUMC)
    • Department of Urology, Peking Union Medical College HospitalChinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College (CAMS & PUMC)
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12185-013-1261-8

Cite this article as:
Wang, C., Wang, H., Wang, Q. et al. Int J Hematol (2013) 97: 240. doi:10.1007/s12185-013-1261-8

Abstract

To summarize the clinicopathological features, therapeutic regimens, and outcomes for patients with primary testicular lymphoma (PTL), we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 13 patients diagnosed with PTL between 2001 and 2012 at our hospital. Average age at diagnosis was 62.2 ± 13.9 years, and all patients presented with painless testicular swelling. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was the dominant histotype (69.2 %). All 13 patients were treated with inguinal orchiectomy and received chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Complete follow-up data were available for 10 patients with an average follow-up duration of 28.4 ± 30.9 months. Seven patients were evaluated as Ann Arbor stage I or II, and three as stage III or IV. Eight patients were found to have hypoechogenic and hypervascular signals in the testis on ultrasound examination. Complete remission was achieved in six patients, and four patients who were still undergoing chemotherapy during the last follow-up showed no signs of relapse. Of the 10 patients with complete follow-up records, three had relapses, which occurred in the CNS, epiglottis, and the nasal cavity. Time to relapse in these cases was 2, 7, and 11 months, respectively (3/10). The mean progression-free survival was 22.57 months (range 1.1–101.9 months).

Keywords

Primary testicular lymphomaLarge B-cell lymphomaTesticular hydroceleTreatmentPatient outcomes

Abbreviations

AFP

Alpha-fetoprotein

β-HCG

β-Human chorionic gonadotropin

CNS

Central nervous system

CT

Computed tomography

CR

Complete remission

DLBCL

Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

DICE

Dexamethasone, ifosfamide, cisplatin, and etoposide

ESHAP

Etoposide, solumedrol (methylprednisolone), ara-C (high-dose cytarabine), and cisplatin

IPI

International Prognostic Index

MRI

Magnetic resonance imaging

NHL

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

OS

Overall survival

PFS

Progression-free survival

PTL

Primary testicular lymphoma

Supplementary material

12185_2013_1261_MOESM1_ESM.doc (74 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 74 kb)

Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2013