Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 164–172

Prescribing exercise for women

Authors

    • Departments of Medicine and OrthopedicsUniversity of California, San Francisco
  • Nicole Appelle
    • Division of General Internal MedicineUniversity of California, San Francisco
  • Sarina K. Behera
    • Departments of Cardiology and PediatricsCalifornia Pacific Medical Center
Women's Issues (MA Goolsby, Section editor)

DOI: 10.1007/s12178-013-9163-1

Cite this article as:
Senter, C., Appelle, N. & Behera, S.K. Curr Rev Musculoskelet Med (2013) 6: 164. doi:10.1007/s12178-013-9163-1

Abstract

One- half of women in the United States do not meet the weekly dose of physical activity recommended by the Centers for Disease Control. Many women could benefit tremendously if they were to adopt a more active lifestyle. Health benefits from exercise include lowering the risk for cardiovascular disease, slowing the rate of bone loss in osteoporosis, and improving mood during pregnancy. In this article, we review the health benefits that women may gain from physical activity and the recommendations for physical activity for adults in the United States. We offer evidence supporting use of the exercise prescription, discuss how to write an exercise prescription, and how to tailor the exercise prescription for women with particular medical problems.

Keywords

Exercise prescriptionPhysical activityExerciseWomenPrimary careFitnessCardiovascular diseaseHypertensionCongestive heart failureDiabetesOsteoarthritisOsteoporosisDepressionCognitive declinePregnancyObesity

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013