Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 347–354

Addressing the Cardiometabolic Risk of Working in Physically Demanding Occupations

  • Jamie F. Burr
  • Jack M. Goodman
  • Scott G. Thomas
  • Veronica K. Jamnik
  • Norman Gledhill
Physical Activity (DER Warburton, Section Editor)

DOI: 10.1007/s12170-012-0239-z

Cite this article as:
Burr, J.F., Goodman, J.M., Thomas, S.G. et al. Curr Cardiovasc Risk Rep (2012) 6: 347. doi:10.1007/s12170-012-0239-z

Abstract

Habitual physical activity participation is widely accepted to be a safe and effective method for managing cardiovascular and metabolic disease risk factors. However, engagement in physical activity has the potential to trigger cardiovascular events, especially when the activity is of vigorous intensity and the participant is unfit or has pre-existing cardiometabolic conditions. Occupational physical activity is a population-specific stressor, and there is a clustering of risk factors which predispose to cardiometabolic conditions amongst “blue-collar” workers. These factors centre on physical work demands relative to worker physical fitness, conditions of the working environment (shift work, temperature, noise pollution, air pollution and the nature of the activity) and socioeconomic status-related worker lifestyle. We conclude that the risk of cardiometabolic disease and associated cardiovascular events occurring in physically demanding occupations is dictated by the interaction of numerous factors, many of which are modifiable through habitual physical activity participation.

Keywords

Cardiovascular Exertion Work Job Diabetes Metabolic syndrome Chronic disease Coronary Heart Ischemic Physiology 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jamie F. Burr
    • 1
  • Jack M. Goodman
    • 2
  • Scott G. Thomas
    • 3
  • Veronica K. Jamnik
    • 4
  • Norman Gledhill
    • 5
  1. 1.Cardiovascular Physiology & Rehabilitation Laboratory, Physical Activity and Chronic Disease Prevention UnitUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.Department of Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Physical Education and HealthUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Department of Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Physical Education and HealthUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  4. 4.Human Performance Laboratory & Physical Activity and Chronic Disease Unit, Faculty of Health SciencesYork UniversityTorontoCanada
  5. 5.Human Performance Laboratory & Physical Activity and Chronic Disease Unit, Faculty of Health SciencesYork UniversityTorontoCanada