Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports

, Volume 4, Issue 6, pp 413–420

Smoking as a Chronic Disease

Authors

    • Tobacco Dependence Program, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Division of General Internal MedicineUniversity of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey
  • Amy C. Schmelzer
    • Tobacco Dependence Program, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Division of General Internal MedicineUniversity of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey
  • Patrick N. Lin
    • Tobacco Dependence Program, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Division of General Internal MedicineUniversity of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey
  • Gadiz Garcia
    • Tobacco Dependence Program, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Division of General Internal MedicineUniversity of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12170-010-0125-5

Cite this article as:
Steinberg, M.B., Schmelzer, A.C., Lin, P.N. et al. Curr Cardio Risk Rep (2010) 4: 413. doi:10.1007/s12170-010-0125-5

Abstract

Despite remaining the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, tobacco smoking does not garner the attention it deserves in the medical and public health communities. Smoking is often referred to merely as a “bad habit” that simply requires adequate willpower to conquer effectively. Fortunately, recent attitudes regarding smoking, as illustrated by the latest US Public Health Service Clinical Practice Guidelines, call for a “chronic disease model” for treating tobacco dependence. This article underscores the importance of viewing smoking as a chronic disease by illustrating the effects on morbidity and mortality, discussing the relapsing nature of addiction, outlining the need for continuum of care for different “severities” of illness, and describing the latest research regarding effective treatment components. Tobacco dependence treatments are safe, effective, and cost-saving, and their use should be encouraged and covered by health insurance analogous to other chronic conditions.

Keywords

Smoking cessation Tobacco dependence Nicotine replacement Cessation pharmacotherapy Chronic disease model Cardiovascular risk factor

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010