Food Analytical Methods

, Volume 7, Issue 10, pp 2003–2012

Identification of Acacia Honey Adulteration with Rape Honey Using Liquid Chromatography–Electrochemical Detection and Chemometrics

Authors

  • Jinmei Wang
    • Department of Food Science and Engineering, School of Chemical EngineeringNorthwest University
    • Institute of Analytical Science, Shaanxi Provincial Key Lab of Electroanalytical ChemistryNorthwest University
  • Xiaofeng Xue
    • Bee Product Quality Supervision and Testing Center, Ministry of Agriculture, Institute of Apiculture ResearchChinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
  • Xiaojing Du
    • Institute of Analytical Science, Shaanxi Provincial Key Lab of Electroanalytical ChemistryNorthwest University
  • Ni Cheng
    • Department of Food Science and Engineering, School of Chemical EngineeringNorthwest University
    • Institute of Analytical Science, Shaanxi Provincial Key Lab of Electroanalytical ChemistryNorthwest University
  • Lanzhen Chen
    • Bee Product Quality Supervision and Testing Center, Ministry of Agriculture, Institute of Apiculture ResearchChinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
    • Bee Product Quality Supervision and Testing Center, Ministry of Agriculture, Institute of Apiculture ResearchChinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
  • Jianbin Zheng
    • Institute of Analytical Science, Shaanxi Provincial Key Lab of Electroanalytical ChemistryNorthwest University
    • Department of Food Science and Engineering, School of Chemical EngineeringNorthwest University
    • Institute of Analytical Science, Shaanxi Provincial Key Lab of Electroanalytical ChemistryNorthwest University
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12161-014-9833-7

Cite this article as:
Wang, J., Xue, X., Du, X. et al. Food Anal. Methods (2014) 7: 2003. doi:10.1007/s12161-014-9833-7

Abstract

The adulteration of honey is generally a concern of consumers and management departments of safety and quality. Adding low-price honey to high-price honey is often seen in the market. In this study, a reliable and simple method of liquid chromatography–electrochemical detection (LC-ECD) was presented to detect the adulteration of acacia honey which was added with rape honey at different levels (5–50 %, w/w). Chromatographic separation was carried out with a reversed phase column, and the mobile phase was methanol/2 % (v/v) aqueous acetic acid. Fingerprints of authentic honeys showed that the contents of chlorogenic acid were higher in acacia honey (1.738 mg kg−1), while those of ellagic acid were much lower (0.274 mg kg−1) in rape honey, so the chlorogenic acid and ellagic acid could be considered as possible markers of acacia and rape honeys, respectively. Samples were classified by cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) according to the contents of phenolic acids. The results of PCA showed that chlorogenic acid and ellagic acid were the major variables, and no adulterated sample was identified as authentic honey. The results of cluster analysis (CA) indicated that the samples were appropriately divided into three main clusters, and adulterated samples were identified. Therefore, acacia honey adulteration with rape honey could be undoubtedly detected by LC-ECD combined with chemometric methods down to the level of 5 %.

Keywords

HoneyPhenolic acidsAdulterationLC-ECDChemometrics

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014