Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 47, Issue 3, pp 347–357

Preoperative Sleep Complaints Are Associated with Poor Physical Recovery in the Months Following Cardiac Surgery

Authors

    • Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthUniversity College London
  • Tara Kidd
    • Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthUniversity College London
  • Elizabeth Leigh
    • Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthUniversity College London
  • Amy Ronaldson
    • Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthUniversity College London
  • Marjan Jahangiri
    • Department of Cardiac Surgery, St George’s HospitalUniversity of London
  • Andrew Steptoe
    • Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthUniversity College London
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12160-013-9557-8

Cite this article as:
Poole, L., Kidd, T., Leigh, E. et al. ann. behav. med. (2014) 47: 347. doi:10.1007/s12160-013-9557-8

Abstract

Background

Sleep disturbance is associated with poorer outcomes in cardiac patients, but little is known about the independent role of sleep quality in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients.

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between preoperative sleep complaints and post-operative emotional and physical recovery in CABG surgery patients, independently of demographic, clinical and mood factors.

Methods

Two hundred thirty CABG patients (aged 67.81 ± 9.07 years) completed measures of self-reported sleep complaints before surgery and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), physical symptoms and pain 2 months after surgery.

Results

Greater sleep complaints prior to surgery were associated with greater physical symptoms, poorer physical HRQoL and greater sensory pain after surgery (p < 0.05), but not with affective pain or mental HRQoL. Preoperative mood was not able to explain these associations.

Conclusions

Sleep complaints may be implicated in physical recovery from CABG surgery but further work is needed to understand the role of causal pathways.

Keywords

SleepCoronary artery bypass graft surgeryDepressionHealth-related quality of lifeRecovery

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2013